PSLE Math

 

The recent 2021 PSLE Math paper has done it again! Every year, students and parents take to the internet to consult one another on how to solve a particular math question. This year is no exception.

 

Question involved: (source: Mothership and CNA)

 

Question from my whatspp:

 

*Apparently, there’s different versions of the question. A reader alerted us.

 

I admit. I tried to used algebra to solve it. It didn’t work.

I wanted to text the person who shared the question with me that there must be some other information or that the question is incomplete. Otherwise, how can i not solve it?

My second attempt at the question taught me something. Sometimes, it the user that complicates things. The Singapore Math Model uses Bar Modeling as a pictorial method to solve word problems.

 

Solution based on my whatsapp message:

Please take note that diagram is not drawn to the correct scale. (It doesn’t need to)

And that both Helen and Ivan have the same number of coins.

From the above bar model, we can deduce that it does not matter how many coins do each Helen or Ivan has nor does the question ask the student to solve for the total number of coins.

What we should take note of is that as Ivan has 40 more 20 cent coins than Helen, it would mean that Helen would have 40 more 50 cent coins than Ivan. (Only 2 type of coins involved here, 20 cent and 50 cent)

From here, we know that having more 50 cent coins would mean Helen has more money and by $12 (Difference of 50 cent and 20 cent X Difference of 40 coins)

Since Helen has more 50 cent coins, Ivan’s coins would weight lesser than Helen’s. And what’s the difference? (2.7 g X Difference of 40 coins) = 108g difference. 

Therefore, mass of Ivan’s coins = 1.134kg – 108g = 1.026kg.

 

My math tutor used to tell me that it’s alright when I cannot mange to solve certain questions in the paper. I was quite puzzled by what he said. Now, I seem to realize what he meant. He was saying that as his assumption was that I was able to complete the math papers with above 75% grades on a consistent basis. And that if there were any questions that I could not solve, it still would not amount to my grade being less than A1. 

However, it has always been my goal to get 100% for my math papers. In reality, when you aim for 100, you may fall short a little (careless mistakes, silly errors, etc). But chances are that you would still get the highest possible grade of A1 or AL1. 

So I ask myself: “What would my overall math grade be, if I failed to answer Helen’s and Ivan’s coins question”?

 

To better prepare for the challenges of PSLE Math, we provide Online Math Tuition (4 x 1.5 hours a month). All lessons are conducted online in small groups. Contact us today for more details!

 

Click here to register.

Who should sign up?

Primary 5 and Primary 6 PSLE taking students who are keen to ace their Math papersducation Programme (English, Maths and General Ability). Whatsapp us for more details. 

 

 

THE GIFTED EXAMINATION PROGRAMME (GEP) Sample Test Papers is available for download for all members of The Learning Space. Please sign up here and indicate your interest in getting a sample question for the GEP Sample Test Paper (English).

We provide GEP preparation class online (3 Days) either group or individual 1 on 1. Our GEP Preparation Programme will give your children the critical insights and familiarise your child with question types commonly seen during the GEP round 1 Screening Exercise. Run twice each year, this highly sought after popular programme is conducted by our team of specialist teachers and provide practical strategies and techniques to excel in the MOE’s highly competitive 2-stage selection exercise.

What is the GEP Programme?

GEP Screening Exercise is held annually for all Primary 3 students in Singapore.

There are two stages:

Stage 1: Screening

Stage 2: Selection

At the Learning Space, we provide GEP Preparatory Tuition for students who are keen to have a head start. Students can choose a small group class or engage a 1 to 1 GEP Prep Teacher to guide them in this exciting endeavour. Lessons are available online or in-person and conducted by our team of highly experienced GEP Teachers. 

How can you prepare your child for the GEP Identification Exercise?

Is a gifted child a product of nature or nurture? Since time immemorial, this has been a highly controversial subject. Evidence from many recent source points to the superior character of most of the homes or families as a strong contributing factor to the high standing of these boys and girls whose I.Qs are 130 or higher. According to the University of Chicago Press Journals, other than genetics, nurture is an important consideration and there has been a consideration of methods of training gifted children. 

To help parents better prepare for the challenges of the GEP Prep test, we provide a 16 hours of intensive preparation (6 lessons of 3 hours each) to tackle the commonly tested components of the GEP Screening Exercise. All lessons are conducted online in small groups. Contact us today for more details!

GEP Boot Camp

Click here to register.

Who should sign up?

Primary 2 and Primary 3 students who are keen to gain exposure to sample questions of the Gifted Education Programme (English, Maths and General Ability). Whatsapp us at 9364 6977 for more details. 

 

 

Singapore Secondary School Cut-off Points 2021 

 

 

In a blink of an eye, soon it will be time for this year’s Primary Six students to go for their PSLE exams in September to October 2021. Click here to download the latest PSLE schedule 2021 from MOE.  In view of the recent changes to the PSLE scoring system to AL 1 to AL8, it is critical that students and parents examine closely which secondary schools they would like to go.

Many questions come to mind, “How to choose a secondary school that suits my children? What are the cut off points? What are the academic programmes to consider? Does the school offer DSA admission? What are the niche programmes offered by the school? Any affiliations to Junior Colleges?” The list of questions that parents ponder on goes on and on endlessly. 

Our PSLE series of articles will give you key insights such as providing a list of the latest secondary school cut-off points so that you can guide your child to make his/her plans. 

PSLE Scoring System 

Four important things you MUST know when it comes to choosing a suitable secondary school

1) Watch out for Affiliation Bonus  

Schools that are affiliated with one another offer a lower cut-off point to students from affiliated Primary Schools. These schools with exception of Nanyang High and Hwa Chong Institution, are typically missionary schools like SJI Junior, CHIJ Kellock Convent, CHIJ Katong, MGS, and ACS et cetera. 

2) Choosing a school with the ‘right’ school culture. What is a SAP school? 

Special Assistance Plan (SAP) known in Chinese as 新加玻特选中学 / 特选学校, caters to students who excel in both their Mother Tongue and the English language. At the moment, the SAP schools only cater to the Mandarin mother tongue language.

SAP schools tend to place a higher priority on Chinese bi-cultural education and most offer special programmes like Bicultural Studies and tend to attract more students from China. Historically, the SAP schools normally attract the Top 10% – 20% of each PSLE cohort.

This is especially relevant for students who took Higher Chinese at PSLE,

According to MOE, Students who obtained Distinction/Merit/Pass in HCL and a PSLE Score of 14 or better (i.e. PSLE Score ≤ 14) at PSLE will be eligible for posting advantage to SAP schools. However, under the new scoring system, students with better PSLE scores will be posted first to SAP schools, event if they DID NOT take HCL. In the scenario where students have the same PSLE score, those with better HCL grades will be posted to SAP schools first. 

 

There are a total of 26 SAP schools (both primary and secondary) in Singapore. Secondary SAP schools include highly established school Nan Chiau High, Chung Cheng (Main), Maris Stella High School, Anglican High School, CHIJ Saint Nicholas’ Girls, Nan Hua High School.   

 

3) Consider the IB Programme 

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Programme is another option for your child to consider. Embarking on the programme will eventually lead students to IBDP which is the equivalent of GCE A’levels. Most of the international schools in Singapore usually adopt the iGCSE and IB education programme. Students who choose the IB Programme will have the opportunity to enjoy a more holistic programme offering. Local schools like The Singapore Sports School, SOTA, MGS, SJI, ACS offers students IB programme. The Learning Space is a pioneer in IB and iGCSE tuition, our team of IB tutors are fully equipped and highly experienced in helping students achieve their ideal scores for the IB programme. It is important tot note that the IB curriculum places emphasis on the research processes of the students, as well as on their inquiry and problem-solving skills. Students will also have to work on programmes like the theory of knowledge essay and the individual extended essay, which are completed by students over a specified period of time under teacher supervision. 

You can find out more about IB tuition and contact our IB tutors here

4) What is an IP Programme? 

Integrated Programme (IP) is a programme where the students do not take GCE O levels instead they will embark on a six-years education programme from secondary school to junior college, culminating with the GCE A-level exams. Therefore the programme is also known as the “choo-train”, where students who get into this programme will be automatically secured a spot in the respective JCs, without having to go through another examination. 

The list of IP schools in Singapore are Dunman High, River Valley High, MGS, Nanyang, Hwa Chong Institution, Raffles Girls School, Raffles Institution, Catholic High, Cedar Girls, National Junior College, Temasek Junior College and more.

INSIDERS’ TIPS: Advice for Parents 

Former HOD of Language Arts from a top IP school, Ms Melanie Chan shares that IP programme (at Year One and Two) emphasises more on the holistic development of students who exhibited higher academic competence. Instead of “chasing the curriculum” students are given the opportunity to explore in depth and alternative assessments. For instance, IP students in Raffles Girls School have the opportunity to learn how to write poems and biography. They learn how to create animations and get fully hands-on Applied Science concepts. IP schools also tend to attract former GEP gifted students because of their academic rigour. However, it is important for parents to note that IP schools can sometimes be regarded as an epitome of the pressure cooker system because the curriculum for IP school can get progressively demanding at the Upper Secondary Level as teachers start to prepare students for A’levels. Students who are self-directed learners will definitely thrive in an IP school environment. Like the IB students, IP students are also expected to take English Literature as part of their Language Arts programmes. Students who need tuition and guidance for IP Language Arts can contact our team of MOE tutors. 

Cut-off points for Secondary School in 2021 

 See below for the affiliated points for the school. 

School   IP/IB SAP school Express Normal Academic Normal Technical  
Hwa Chong Institution Boys IP 4-7  
Raffles Girls’ School Girls IP   4-6  
Methodist Girls’ School Girls IP   4-6  
Nanyang Girls’ School Girls IP 4-8 /4-7  
Raffles Institution Boys IP   4-6  
Dunman High School Co-ed IP 4-8  
National Junior College Co-ed IP   5-7  
CHIJ St Nicholas Girls’ School Girls IP 4-7  
Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) Boys IP   4-7  
Catholic High School Boys IP 5-8  
Methodist Girls’ School Girls   6-8 /7-17  
Cedar Girls’ Secondary School Girls IP   4-8  
CHIJ St Nicholas Girls’ School Girls 5-8/5-14  
River Valley High School Co-ed IP 4-9  
Singapore Chinese Girls’ School Girls IP   4-8  
Singapore Chinese Girls’ School Girls   5-9 /8-17  
Victoria School Boys IP   5-8  
Catholic High School Boys 6-9/6-12  
Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) Boys   6-9/7-13  
Cedar Girls’ Secondary School Girls   4-9  
Paya Lebar Methodist Girls’ School Girls   8-11 /4-20 21-23 /21-25 25-28 /26-28  
St Joseph’s Institution Boys IP   4-8  
Temasek Junior College Co-ed IP   4-9  
Anderson Secondary School Co-ed   4-10 21-24 25-28  
CHIJ Toa Payoh Girls   6-10/7-20 21-24/21-25 25-30/27  
Victoria School Boys   6-9  
Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road) Boys   6-11/7-22 21-21/21-24 25-26/25-28  
Bukit Panjang Government High School Co-ed   6-11 21-22 25-26  
Nan Hua High School Co-ed 6-11  
St Joseph’s Institution Boys   5-10 /8-12  
Nan Chiau High School Co-ed 4-11  
Chung Cheng High School (Main) Co-ed 6-11  
Crescent Girls’ School Girls   6-11  
Fairfield Methodist School Co-ed   8-11 /8-20 21/21-24 25-27 /25-28  
St Andrew’s Secondary School Boys   7-10 /7-22 21-23 /21-25 25-26 /25-29  
St Margaret’s Secondary Girls   9-11 /9-20 21-22 /22-25 25-27 /25-28  
Swiss Cottage Secondary School Co-ed   4-11 21-22 25-26  
Chung Cheng High School (Yishun) Co-ed   6-11 21-23 25-27  
Anglican High School Co-ed 5-12  
Commonwealth Secondary School Co-ed   8-12 21-23 25-28  
Yishun Town Secondary School Co-ed   6-13 21-23 25-27  
CHIJ St Theresa’s Convent Girls   11-13/8-20 22-24/21-25 25-29/25-28  
Ngee Ann Secondary School Co-ed   5-12 /12-16 21-22 /21-25 25-26 /26-28  
CHIJ St Joseph’s Convent Girls   9-13/8-29 21-23/21-25 25-27/25-29  
Maris Stella High School Boys 7-12 /8-16  
Kuo Chuan Presbyterian Secondary School Co-ed   8-13 /11-20 21-24 /21-25  
Zhonghua Secondary School Co-ed   9-13 21-23 25-27  
Fuhua Secondary School Co-ed   6-13 21-23 25-28  
Presbyterian High School Co-ed   8-13 21-23 25-27  
Tanjong Katong Girls’ School Girls   5-13  
Xinmin Secondary School Co-ed   8-14 21-23 25-27  
Clementi Town Secondary School Co-ed   8-14 21-24 25-28  
Riverside Secondary School Co-ed   6-14 21-23 25-27  
Temasek Secondary School Co-ed   7-13 21-22 25-27  
Holy Innocents’ High School Co-ed   10-15 /11-22 21-23/21-25 25-26 /25-28  
Kranji Secondary School Co-ed   10-14 21-23 25-27  
Tanjong Katong Secondary School Co-ed   9-14  
Dunman Secondary School Co-ed   9-14 21-23 25-27  
Edgefield Secondary School Co-ed   7-14 21-22 25-27  
St Patrick’s School Boys   10-14 /12-20 21-22 /21-24 25-27 /26-28  
Ang Mo Kio Secondary School Co-ed   11-16 21-24 25-28  
Bukit Batok Secondary School Co-ed   11-15 21-23 25-28  
Geylang Methodist School Co-ed    11-15/13-21 21-23 /21-25 25-26 /25-29  
Jurong Secondary School Co-ed   8-16 21-23 25-28  
CHIJ Katong Convent Girls   11-15/11-20 21-24/21-25 25-30/26-28  
Evergreen Secondary School Co-ed   9-15 21-23 25-27  
St Anthony’s Canossian Secondary School Girls   11-15 /10-22 21-24 / 21-25 25-27 /25-28  
Bowen Secondary School Co-ed   10-16 21-24 25-27  
Gan Eng Seng School Co-ed   7-15 21-23 25-26  
Hua Yi Secondary School Co-ed   10-16 21-23 25-29  
St Gabriel’s Secondary School Boys   10-17 /13-22 21-23 /22-25 25-28 /26-27  
St Hilda’s Secondary School Co-ed   12-15 /13-22 21-23 /21-25 25-28 /26-28  
Pei Hwa Secondary School Co-ed   11-16 21-24 25-26  
West Spring Secondary School Co-ed   10-17 21-23 25-26  
Hai Sing Catholic School Co-ed   10-16 21-24 25-28  
Ahmad Ibrahim Secondary School Co-ed   10-17 21-24 25-28  
Mayflower Secondary School Co-ed   12-17 21-24 25-28  
Deyi Secondary School Co-ed   13-17 21-25 25-28  
Queensway Secondary School Co-ed   11-17 21-24 25-27  
Pasir Ris Secondary School Co-ed   11-18 21-24 25-28  
Unity Secondary School Co-ed   13-18 21-24 25-28  
Pasir Ris Crest Secondary School Co-ed   9-17 21-25 25-28  
Woodlands Ring Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-24 25-28  
Bedok View Secondary School Co-ed   13-18 21-24  
Chua Chu Kang Secondary School Co-ed   216 171 137  
Beatty Secondary School Co-ed   12-18 21-25 25-27  
Yuan Ching Secondary School Co-ed   8-19 21-25 25-28  
Compassvale Secondary School Co-ed   11-18 21-24 25-27  
Kent Ridge Secondary School Co-ed   10-19 21-24 25-30  
North Vista Secondary School Co-ed   12-18 21-24 25-27  
Orchid Park Secondary School Co-ed   12-19 21-24 25-28  
Bukit View Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-25 26-30  
Peirce Secondary School Co-ed   12-19 22-25 26-29  
Zhenghua Secondary School Co-ed   12-20 21-24 25-27  
Bedok South Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-25 25-28  
Greendale Secondary School Co-ed   8-18 21-23 25-27  
Hillgrove Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-24 25-28  
Meridian Secondary School Co-ed   15-19 21-24 25-27  
Woodgrove Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-23 25-27  
Jurong West Secondary School Co-ed   10-18 21-24 25-28  
Montfort Secondary School Boys   15-20 /13-21 21-25 /23-25 25-28 /26-28  
Tampines Secondary School Co-ed   13-19 21-25 25-28  
Christ Church Secondary School Co-ed   207 166 109  
Yishun Secondary School Co-ed   207 164 109  
Seng Kang Secondary School Co-ed   13-19 21-24 25-27  
Admiralty Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-24 25-28  
Naval Base Secondary School Co-ed   11-20 21-24 25-28  
Hougang Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-25 26-27  
Punggol Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-24 25-27  
Regent Secondary School Co-ed   15-21 21-25  
Jurongville Secondary School Co-ed   16-20 21-25 25-30  
Westwood Secondary School Co-ed   11-22 21-25 25-28  
Greenridge Secondary School Co-ed   195 156 126  
Canberra Secondary School Co-ed   11-22 21-24 25-29  
New Town Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-25 21-25  
Juying Secondary School Co-ed   12-21 21-25 25-28  
Pei Cai Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 22-25 26-29  
Queenstown Secondary School Co-ed   16-22 21-25 25-28  
Assumption English School Co-ed   10-22 22-25 25-29  
Bartley Secondary School Co-ed   13-22 21-25 25-28  
Bedok Green Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-25 25-28  
Bendemeer Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-29  
Boon Lay Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 101  
Broadrick Secondary School Co-ed   7-22 21-25 25-27  
Bukit Merah Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Changkat Changi Secondary School Co-ed   13-22 21-25  
Damai Secondary School Co-ed   15-22 21-25 25-28  
Dunearn Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-30  
East Spring Secondary School Co-ed   12-22 22-25 25-28  
Fajar Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-30  
Fuchun Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 100  
Guangyang Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 21-25 26-29  
Junyuan Secondary School Co-ed   17-22 21-25 25-28  
Loyang View Secondary School Co-ed   15-21/13-22 22-25/23-25 26-28/26-28  
Manjusri Secondary School Co-ed   15-21 /13-22 22-25 /23-25 26-28 /26-28  
Marsiling Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-30  
Northbrooks Secondary School Co-ed   12-22 21-25 25-28  
Northland Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 22-25 26-28  
Outram Secondary School Co-ed   4-22 22-25 26-30  
Ping Yi Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 108  
Sembawang Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Serangoon Garden Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-28  
Serangoon Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 22-25 25-28  
Springfield Secondary School Co-ed   10-22 21-25 25-28  
Tanglin Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 100  
Teck Whye Secondary School Co-ed   6-22 21-25 25-29  
Whitley Secondary School Co-ed   7-22 21-25 26-29  
Woodlands Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Yio Chu Kang Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 22-25 25-28  
Yuhua Secondary School Co-ed   14-22 21-25 25-30  
Yuying Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 26-28   
Yusof Ishak Secondary School Co-ed          

Now that you can refer to this list of cut-off points, it’s time to decide which school you’d be applying for! Why not give yourself a headstart for your secondary school life with

  


Want more tips for PSLE or Oral? Watch our youtube video here

It’s finally here! Your O’levels results are released! 

Despite the pandemic, students who sat for the O-level examinations last year set a roaring new record, with over 80 per cent of the cohort attaining five or more passes. 

What should you do next?

For those of you who passed with flying colours, congratulations. For some who didn’t do as well as you like and aren’t sure what to do next. Grab a treat and read on.

 

Let’s start by look at some numbers.

How did the previous batch of candidates fare? In 2019, 85.2 per cent secured five or more passes, while the 2020 batch scored 85.4 percent, up 0.4 percentage points from the previous year.

The Ministry of Education (MOE) said that of the 20,300 candidates who sat for O’levels in 2019, 52 per cent were posted to the five polytechnics here. Another 38 per cent were given places in the junior colleges (JCs) and Millennia Institute, and about another 10 per cent were posted to the Institute of Technical Education.

What to do after O’levels?

 

First and foremost, be brave, if results aren’t what you expected or you have changed in the last year and now want something different, then do it! Defer entry, travel, change your course just don’t feel trapped into doing something that isn’t right for you. If your results did not meet your expectations, chin up. Take comfort in the fact that local universities will no longer factor in O-level results for admission come 2020. 

There could be a myriad of reasons why O’levels did not go well for you. Perhaps, you were too stressed or ran out of time. Move forward. You can’t change the past, but you can make things better. 

Here are some paths you can consider after your O’levels results. 

1. Consider retaking your O-levels

If you have an ambition to fulfil, a dream course or school in mind that you cannot get into after trying all avenues (like appeals), give this option some serious thought. Being a year behind your peers is perfectly okay; everyone takes different paths and you’ll see this especially in polytechnics, where you can have classmates twice your age!

If you decide that this is what you want to pursue, please be reminded that you’ll have to pay to sit for the exams again. There are two ways to go about it:

  • Retaking your O-levels as a private candidate 
  • Retaking your O-levels in your current secondary school, which needs you to meet certain criteria

Retaking as a private candidate demands a lot of self-discipline. You’ll need to work out a studying schedule and keep to it, find out when and where to register for the papers and remember that the extra year you’re taking is an investment of your time and money. Sign up for our preparatory courses for O’levels English or tuition classes and let our tutors guide you. Most of our tutors are former teachers who will definitely be able to give you sound advice. Click here to reach us. 

Alternatively, ITE offers a General Education (GE) Programme that offers part-time classes for English, Combined Humanities, Maths, Additional Mathematics, Double Sciences, Literature, Geography, Chinese, Tamil as well as Principles of Accounts. Classes run up to 32 weeks.

2. Take a Foundation Course

Private institutions here offer foundation diplomas that you can take—these last anywhere from 6-12 months full-time and give you the qualifications to progress to relevant diplomas offered by the same institution. Admission criteria is manageable for foundation diplomas; typically, all you’ll require is one GCE O-level pass and an O-level grade in English ranging from A1-D7, depending on the private institution.

Alternatively, you can explore pre-university entry programmes from private universities like Kaplan, MDIS, James Cook or even foundation year programmes abroad (which give you the chance to gain admission to overseas universities).

Do note that this option can be very costly and in times of Covid-19 pandemic, it may not be the best approach at the moment. 

3. Slow down and study in a Centralised Institute

How about joining Millennia Institute (MI)?A Centralised Institute offers three-year pre-university courses under three streams. These are the arts and science streams that a typical JC offers as well as an additional commerce stream. 

The three years will give you a little more time to catch up on your studies and mug for the A-levels if you need some time (again, you’ll still need self-discipline). You’ll need an L1R4 of 5-20 to be eligible for admission.

Specific subject requirements are as follows:

English Higher Chinese/Malay/Tamil Chinese/Malay/Tamil Chinese Basic/Malay Basic/Tamil Basic E Math/A Math
A1-C6 A1-E8 A1-D7 Merit/Pass A1-D7

 

If you find yourself unable to meet these requirements, Millennia Institute has a conditional student programme which will require you to re-sit for the relevant language and/or mathematics papers O-levels. You can re-take them for 2 times before your offer is revoked.

4. Consider enrolling for Poly Early Admissions Exercise

You can consider studying for a NITEC or Higher NITEC in ITE, before applying for a place in a Polytechnic via the Early Admissions Exercise (EAE). The EAE is a centralised aptitude-based admissions exercise, which allows students to apply for and receive conditional offers for admission to polytechnics prior to receiving their final grades.

This will be a longer route that will require a lot of resilience, but there are many who have taken it before you and succeeded. It’s also a suitable option if you’ve already set your heart on a polytechnic course, or have narrowed down an area of interest. You might need to submit portfolios and undergo interviews and aptitude tests, so start preparing early!

Hopefully, this article clears your doubts and let us link you up with a team of best tutors to help you fulfil your dreams. We are currently offering a trial lesson for private candidates. Email us your interest today.

“We can never close the gender divide.” Do you agree? 

(For JC GP Prelims Questions 2020, subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel. You will be the first to get the latest essays and questions!)

GP Essay Question: Model Essay

As the COVID-19 pandemic pushes on and persists to affect lives and livelihoods around the world, we are witnessing a tide of economic fallout, which has a regressive effect on gender equality. According to Mckinsey Research, women’s jobs are 1.8 times more vulnerable in this crisis compared to men’s jobs and It is predicted that women make up 39 percent of global employment, will account for 54 percent of overall job losses. Some put forth the view that we can never close the gender divide due to such economic realities, legislative barriers and sexist mindsets that pervades in our society today, creating an irreconcilable chasm between males and females. This has led some to believe that the gender divide is insurmountable. However, it is my conviction that while closing the gender divide will be difficult, it is not out of the question, mainly attributed to changing attitudes in legislature and shifts in societal mindsets towards women. Ergo, it will be difficult, but closing the gender divide is indeed possible.

Some espouse the opinion that it is not possible to close the gender divide largely due to the existence of legislative barriers that institutionalise gender discrimination and perpetuate gender inequality. In Singapore, for instance, although the Government has taken steps in the recent years to educate and incentivise employers to be fair and to promote flexible work arrangements so that, yet there is still an absence of legislation that clearly lays out employer duties and responsibilities, this results in many companies being able to get away with little more than superficial commitments to be more inclusive. The situation is even more bleak in less developed countries like India. In the recent years, the numerous cases of rape across the country once again exposed the failures of the criminal justice system. Nearly six years after the government amended laws and put in place new guidelines aimed at justice for survivors of rape and sexual violence, yet girls and women continue to face barriers to reporting such crimes. Victim-blaming is also rampant, and the lack of witness and victim protection laws make girls and women from marginalized communities even more vulnerable to harassment and threats. Across the spectrum, from developing to more developed countries, what persists is a disturbing observation that legislation either explicitly hurts women and promotes sexism, or it condones behaviours that hurt women and promote sexism. It remains a deeply painful and saddening reality that the patriarchy continues to be entrenched in legislature, and ingrained in societal institutions, leading some to think that it is a futile quest and that we can never close the gender divide. In view of all these challenges, it does seem like an uphill task when it comes to closing the gender divide. But to say that it is an impossible dream would be too fatalistic. I strongly stand by the view that closing the gender divide is not completely impossible- there is definitely more than a glimmer of hope. First and foremost, there have been changing attitudes in legislature that have led to tremendous progress for women’s rights on paper. Right here in Singapore, the government has just announced that they will embark on a review of women’s issues showing a strong committed step towards greater gender equality. In the pipeline are a series of engagements termed as “Conversations on Women Development” scheduled to take place between the public and private sectors, as well as non-governmental organisations, with the objective of identifying and tackling issues concerning women in Singapore.  These will culminate in a White Paper to be issued by the Government in the first half of 2021.

Across the globe, in terms of the right to political representation, the presence of women  has been growing- in the upcoming US Presidential elections, Kamala Harris’s nomination as the Vice President for the democratic party is a milestone. She is the first woman and the first person of colour to serve as vice president.  In Canada, Justin Trudeau made half the ministers in his cabinet women. Similarly, in Singapore, other than having a first female president, the recent election 29 per cent of the 93 seats for elected Members of Parliament (MPs), 27 – or elected seats – went to women, compared to 21 out of 89 seats after the 2015 polls. Even in countries without a female head of government, changes in legislature have indeed been growing to ameliorate gender inequality and boost the rights of women. Japan has adopted new legislation to promote women’s political participation by urging political parties to make the number of male and female candidates as equal as possible and set targets for gender parity. Notoriously patriarchal countries like Afghanistan had a record of 417 female candidates that participated in the October parliamentary elections in 2018. These are all concrete evidence that legislature has been changing to increase rights for women and enact gender parity, closing the gender divide. With more female representation in politics and in view of these steps towards women representation, it is still very much possible for us to close the gender divide in the near future. 

In addition to this, it is definitely possible to close the gender divide because there has also been shifting societal attitudes towards women. At a societal level, the #MeToo movement directed unprecedented attention to the historic injustices and inequalities experienced by women, specifically those related to sexual harassment in the workplace. Led by grassroots activists, this movement gained traction across Asia, opening space for countless stories of harassment and new opportunities to hold perpetrators to account. Even countries that have been traditionally patriarchal in nature like South Korea is making headways in gender equality. Enterprising Korean women are increasingly visible in a traditionally male dominated country like South Korea. More young women are earning university degrees than men. More than 70% of women between 25 and 34 are active in the workforce. Young women are far more vocal than previous generations in challenging the conservative social mores that hold them back. For instance, two female Youtube Influencers Jung Se-young and Baeck Hana, are part of a wave of feminist activism that has swept South Korea. These ladies have cut their hair, thrown away their make-up and sworn off relationships with men. With the advent of social media, the influence of feminism is increasing spreading across social media platforms and society is waking up to the fact that young digital natives no longer want these conservative traditions, and women are free to reject them. Thus, it is highly possible that due to shifting societal attitudes that promote gender equality, the gender divide will be definitely be closed. 

All in all, although the path towards gender equality may seem frustratingly slow. But the fact that inequality is now being openly discussed is progress in itself. In these recent years, societies and government worldwide have been placing gender equality issues on their agenda. With this growing trend towards more rights for women on paper, coupled with the shifting societal mindsets, it is completely possible that our generations will be able to close the gender in our lifetime. The journey towards gender equality may be winding. There is no silver bullet and admittedly there is a lot to do in the field of equality, but nothing is impossible. We must and can continue to fight and narrow the gender divide. 

(This essay has been reviewed and marked by GP Tutors. For GP tuition by school teachers or full time tutors, contact us today.)

 

What do H1, H2 and H3 in JC mean?

GCE A-Level Singapore Special

 

Advanced level, better known as the A’levels is the national exam that students will take after the GCE Ordinary Level aka O’levels. Alternatively, secondary students in Singapore can proceed to other forms of tertiary education, which is any one of the following: ITE and  Polytechnic.

 

There are 3 different tertiary options for a student after their O Level results; ITE (Nitec or Higher Nitec), Polytechnic and Junior College (JC) or Millennia Institution (MI). 

Junior College

The rumour in the grapevine has always been that by passing your O’levels you prove that you’re not an idiot… but by passing your A’ levels you prove that you’re smart”. Whether this holds any truth remains open to speculation, but what is real is that in order to enter any Junior Colleges in Singapore, students have to either go through the traditional academic route (usually the top 20 percent of the cohort) where they will have to excel at their L1R5 which means first language plus best other 5 subjects (The L1R4 would be for Polytechnic/ITE entry). Do note that a maximum of 4 points can be deducted from a student’s raw L1R4/5 score. (The Raw Scores is the score students have obtained without any deduction of points from CCA or Higher Mother Tongue Language (HMTL). 

Students can also enjoy 2 points from their CCA achievements (usually leadership, competition participation etc) and 2 points can also be deducted from passing their Higher Mother Tongue Language in Secondary school. 

 

What does entering Junior College in Singapore mean? 

When students choose to join a Junior College, this means students will embark on a 2-year programme and take the GCE Cambridge A-Level examinations after that. The Singapore GCE Cambridge A-Level is slightly different from the International Cambridge A-Level. For students who are from IP schools, they will join their affiliated junior colleges where some students are from the O’levels. For instance, a student from Temasek IP Programme will progress to Temasek Junior College while students from RI and RGS will join Raffles Junior College, now known as Raffles Institution located at RI. Some schools like River Valley High School offers both Junior and Senior High, students will stay within their school (usually moving to a new building for their final two years). 

Not sure about what are the cut-off points requirements to enter Junior College? 

These are the cut-off points for your reference. 

Below is a table stating the cut-off points for 2021 for the different streams in JC, ranked according to alphabetical order. Please note that you will need to check the requirements each year with your choice colleges. For cut off points in 2022, you will need to check back here again. 

List of Junior Colleges in Singapore Arts Science / IB
Anderson Serangoon Junior College, ASRJC 11 11
Anglo-Chinese Junior College, ACJC 9 8
Anglo-Chinese School (Independent), ACSI 5
Catholic Junior College, CJC 13 13
Dunman High School, DHS 9 8
Eunoia Junior College, EJC 8 7
Hwa Chong Institution, HCI 5 4
Jurong Pioneer Junior College, JPJC 16 15
Nanyang Junior College, NYJC 6 6
National Junior College, NJC 8 7
Raffles Institution, RI 5 4
River Valley High School, RVHS 9 8
St. Andrew’s Junior College, SAJC 11 10
St. Joseph’s Institution, SJI 8
Tampines Meridian Junior College, TMJC 13 13
Temasek Junior College, TJC 9 9
Victoria Junior College, VJC 8 7
Yishun Innova Junior College, YIJC 20 20

Millennia Institution (MI) – An Alternative to Junior College

Junior colleges are not the only way to A’levels. O’level graduates can also pursue a three-year course at Millennia Institution (MI), the only three-year pre university institution in Singapore Some parents may remember days where there used to be another Pre-University Insitute known as the Jurong Institute (JI). At MI, the school offers the same subjects and curriculum as the Junior Colleges in Singapore.  However, the only difference they have is that the Milennia Institution is a 3-year Pre-U course, while the other Junior Colleges offer only 2 years. To enter MI, the school will consider the student’s L1R4 instead of their L1R5. 

Millennia Institute is the only Centralised Institute offering a 3-year Pre-University course, leading to the GCE ‘A’ Level certification. For students who took the GCE ‘O’ Level examination and are eligible to apply for admission through the Joint Admissions Exercise (JAE), the minimum requirements specified below must be met.

 

  1. Aggregate Range for L1R4 ≤ 20.
  2. Meet Subject Requirements:
Subject Requirement
English Language A1 to C6
Mother Tongue Language:
       Chinese Language, Malay Language, Tamil Language
OR Higher Chinese Language, Higher Malay Language, Higher Tamil Language
OR Chinese Language ‘B’ Syllabus, Malay Language ‘B’ Syllabus, Tamil Language ‘B’ Syllabus
A1 to D7
A1 to E8
Merit or Pass
Mathematics:
       Mathematics
OR Additional Mathematics
A1 to D7
 A1 to D7

Students who satisfy the conditional admission criteria and are conditionally admitted to Millennia Institute would be required to re-sit for the relevant language and/or mathematics papers by the following year’s GCE ‘O’ Level Examination.

For more information, please access the MOE website

Your ultimate guide to Singapore GCE Cambridge A-Level Curriculum

Step 1: Choose a stream.

Depending on your score, you will be eligible for different streams Science or Arts when they are choosing for their post-secondary choices. For students, who wish to pursue Business Management at A’level, the option will be to join MI as most JCs do not offer this subject. 

Step 2: Find a college that offers you the best standing

Consider your preferred stream over your dream Junior College. Most students, if not all, have their ideal Junior Colleges that they want to enter. Some are doing so because of a particular school’s brand name or heritage, others want to keep their family tradition and join their parent’s alma mater, whatever the motivation, it is worth to take a moment and consider “What’s at stake?”. Ultimately, you are looking for entry to University and it is pivotal to note that some students do consider entering a lower-tier JC so that they can stay in the science stream which offers them more options to courses in University. 

Step 3: Decide on what are your H1, H2, H3 subjects

The H in H1, H2 and H3 stands for Higher. 

To enter University, you need this minimum subject combination:

  • Three H2 content-based subjects 
  • One H1 content-based subject 
  • Compulsory H1 subjects
    • Mother-Tongue Language (MTL) if you did not take higher Chinese at O’levels
    • General Paper
    • Project Work 

Do note that A-Level students must take at least one contrasting subject. What is considered a contrasting subject? For Science stream students, you must take at least one subject from the Humanities & the Arts. On the other hand, Arts stream students must take at least one Science subject, usually H1 or H2 Mathematics. 

What is the difference between H1 and H2 subjects? 

The difference between H1 and H2 subjects is similar to IB Standard Level versus IB Higher Level. H1 subjects cover lesser topics compared to H2 subjects. For instance, H2 Economics is worth 20 rank points and will cover more topics and there are P1 and P2 (Essays). Economics is a challenging subject but most students will choose to take it because it is a practical subject. If you need help in Economics tuition, contact us today via whatsapp us or email.  

Why do some students take four H2 subjects?

Some students can take four H2 content-based subjects if they meet a minimum cut-off points requirement and for students who truly excel in a particular domain, they can choose to pursue H3 content-based subjects if they are eligible. 

How will H3 subjects be graded?

H3 is an additional subject on top of all your H1 and H2 subjects, therefore, you have to be mentally prepared to devote more and sufficient time to all your subjects.  H3 subjects are not graded into the rank points. They are additional subjects that are taken on top of their H1 and H2 subjects. H3 subjects can allow students to be exempted from modules in their university, depending on the course and module taken by the student.

Grading
H3 Grade Marks (%)
Distinction 70 to 100
Merit 55 to 69
Pass 45 to 54
Ungraded 0 to 44

Frequently Asked Questions by JC Students:

What is H1, H2, H3?

H1 subjects are worth 1 point and H2 subjects are worth 2 points. H3 subjects are ONLY offered to students who are academically able to cope with the additional subject(s) on top of their H1 and H2 subjects. Usually, schools will decide who are the students they will be “inviting” to take H3 subjects. Students who choose to take H3 subjects usually want to stand out among competitors who are choosing a similar University course. However, it is important to note that the demands of H3 subjects are considerable, if students are not able to excel in H3 subjects at A’levels it may backfire instead. 

What are rank points?

The maximum number of rank points (RP) for admission to university is 90. A higher score would place a student in a better position for admissions to university. 

Grade Scores H1 Ranking Points H2 Ranking Points
A 70% and above 10 20
B 60% to 69% 8.75 17.5
C 55% to 59% 7.5 15
D 50% to 54% 6.25 12.5
E 45% to 49% (passing grade) 5 10
S (sub-pass) 40% to 44%  2.5 5
Ungraded 39% and below 0 0
GCE a-level Rank Points Calculation

Overview of the GCE A-Level curriculum 

H1, H2 and H3 refer to the depth of the subject taken by the student, with H1 subjects being briefer than H2 and H3 subjects and H3 being a more advanced level of the subject. 

For example, an H2 Chemistry subject would have more topics than H1 Chemistry but their difficulty level of the questions asked would roughly be the same. 

As for H3 Chemistry, the topics learned will not be more than H2 Chemistry since H3 subjects are an extension to H2 subjects. This would mean, learning would be more in-depth and specific when it comes to taking an H3 subject. 

Arts/Science Stream Criteria 

One of the four content-based subjects must be from a contrasting discipline. In other words, you are not allowed to take all Science-based subjects as such; Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology. 

H1 

The compulsory subjects that should be taken by all students would be General Paper and Project Work. Students may also offer Knowledge and Inquiry in place of General Paper (GP), or offer Mother Tongue Language and Literature at H2.

Students can be exempted from taking H1 Mother Tongue if they have passed their Higher Mother Tongue in Secondary School, but it still counts as 1 point. However, if the student did not undertake Higher MTL in Secondary school ‘O’ Level, it is compulsory for him/her to complete H1 MTL in JC. 

National Examinations for H1 subjects will be taken at the end of JC2 (second year of JC) with the exception of H1 Mother-Tongue Language and H1 Project Work which will be taken in JC1. 

H2

Taking 4 H2

Students can be offered to take up 4 H2 instead of the standard combination of 3 H2 and 1 H1 at the beginning of their J1. Schools will determine whether a student can be offered to take up 4 H2s, determining factor being the student’s raw cut-off points when they enter the JC. This differs from JC to JC. 

How to calculate your GCE A-level Rank points

Some Junior colleges include the students’ rank points in their results. If your college does not, do not fret, here’s how you can calculate it.

Rank Points for Students take 3H2 Subjects

[(3 H2 Subjects + 1 H1 Subject + 1 H1 GP + 1 H1 PW + 1 H1 MTL) /100] x 90

= [(20 + 20 + 20 + 10 + 10 + 10 + 10)/100] x 90

= (100/100) x 90

90 RP

Rank Points for Students take 4H2 SubjectsFor students that are offered 4H2 subjects instead of 3H2 and 1H1? RP is calculated this way: 

Should the scenario arise when a 4H2 student do not have an H1 content-based subject, the student’s weakest H2 subject will then be computed as an H1 content subject. This means the rank points of the H2 subject would be halved (calculated as /10 instead of /20).

3 H2 + weakest 1 H2 calculated as H1 + H1 GP + H1 PW

= (20 + 20 + 20) + (17.5/20 x 10) + 10 + 10 

= 88.75 RP

Looking for more GCE A-Level related resources? Click here for GP Model Essays.

The Learning Space is an online resource for students from Preschools to Junior College , The Learning Space provides online tuition for Primary to Junior College A-Level  students. Save time and money on travelling and learn from home with our strong team of former MOE Teachers and tutors. The Learning Space has highly qualified and experienced tutors ready to teach, including ex-MOE teachers that are familiar with the MOE curriculum. 

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PSLE English Essay

Contributed by ex-MOE English Teacher Mrs Wong, click here to contact her for online or face to face tuition

What are the requirements for PSLE English Essay Paper 1?

In Paper 1 English PSLE, students will be required to do Situational Writing and Continuous Writing both of which will add up to 55 marks (approximately 27.5%) of the entire PSLE English grade.

How can students improve their continuous writing?

Use the “Show, not tell”technique

Anton Chekhov once said, “Don’t tell me the moon is shining. Show me the glint of light on broken glass.” His widely popularized adage truly encapsulates the idea of “Show, not tell.”

“Show, not tell” is a writing technique whereby writers use imagery (sensory details and actions) to draw readers into the story rather than merely providing exposition, background information. By showing, the reading experience is definitely more immersive for the reader, allowing them to “be in the room” so to speak, with the characters.

Telling: Gerald is a Nyctophobia who was terribly afraid of the dark.

Showing: Caught off guard by the sudden power outage,  Gerald tensed up completely. He curled tight under the covers, gripped the sheets, and his breathing became more rapid, more shallow as the wind blew through the house and brushed past the curtain. Every fibre of his being commanded him to run, but he was rooted to the spot.

In the “showing” example, rather than merely saying that Gerald is afraid of the dark, we show the readers his experience of that fear and how it takes over him completely. ‘Showing’ is a much better way to bring the readers into the story and convey Gerald’s fear to them in a much more compelling way.

Using this method will definitely allow students to achieve a much higher grade. If you need more help for PSLE English Essay, sign up for two days PSLE English Essay intensive workshop on 20 and 21 July – Intake 1 / 22 and 23 July – Intake 2. Slots are limited. Alternatively, you can engage a private tutor to take your writing to greater heights.

Here’s a sample essay for our PSLE students.

Question: Write about a time a unforgettable or memorable experience

Sweat rolled down my skin in thick, salty beads. Panting furiously, with my feet pounding the pavement, the warm humidity is making my skin feel sticky and suffocated. My uniform and hair, slick with perspiration, clung to my skin. I raced to the train station – if I want to avoid the hassle of jostling with crowds,  I definitely could not afford to miss this train! It had been a long day in school, made worse by the fact that I had to attend two dreary hours of Mathematics supplementary lessons. Joining a queue of adults shuffling onto the bus that had arrived, I speedily dug out my EZ-link card from my bag, praying fervently that there would be vacant seats left

It seemed that Lady Luck was smiling at me – I managed to find one, next to a little girl who was dozing off.  I guessed that she could be no more than five years old. I began to wonder…hmmm…all by herself on public transport at such a tender age? My thoughts then whirled around recent reports of children being abandoned… but on a train? In law-abiding Singapore/ that would be a first!

However intrigued as I was about the possible scenarios, my curiosity about the matter waned as weariness soon took over. Just as I was about to drift into slumberland, a noise jolted me wide awake! The noise had apparently come from the girl next to me – she was bawling uncontrollably!

“Where is my brother?” she sobbed. Trying my best to calm her down, I asked her what had happened.

“He …he was taking me to a movie with…with his friends,” she replied, still sobbing. “I fell asleep and…and now they…they are gone!”

Taking a quick glance at the water bottle the girl was firmly holding on to – I espied a ‘Jennifer Chen’ sticker on the cover. I asked her to open her backpack, hoping to find some form of identification. Thankfully, there was a school handbook bearing a contact number. I let out a sigh of relief and dialled the number promptly.

“KidzGenius Kindergarten, how may I help you?” a staff member answered warmly. After having identified myself and relating the circumstances I was in, I asked if there was a girl in the school by the name of Jennifer Chen and whether I could have his parents’ contacts, of which she duly provided. 

I then called the girl’s mother. Hearing her mother’s voice is as comforting as a hug, Jennifer finally stopped sobbing. I told her mother not to worry and that I would arrange for her to pick up her child at the next station. I even had the presence of mind to take a book from my bag and read a story to her while waiting for her mother to arrive at the station.

Finally, a lady dressed in black approached us with quickened footsteps.

“Mummy!” the girl choked, barely holding back her tears. She immediately sprinted towards her – I had never known five-year-olds to be able to run that fast.

PSLE English Essay

Jennifer’s mother pulled her into her chest, wrapping her arms around her tightly. The emotional reunion that unfolded before my eyes remains a poignant moment etched in my memory. That hug was an exchange of pure joy between the two. Just as I was about to leave, she thanked me profusely for having taken care of Jennifer for her.

Her mother, Mrs Chen, thanked me profusely. Words could not express her gratitude. Later that night, I received a heart-warming text message from Mrs Chen, thanking me again, as well as relating to me how Jennifer’s brother, Thomas, had been too engrossed in chatting with his classmates on the train that he totally forgot about his sister’s existence.

It has been said that ‘every now and then a man’s mind is stretched by a new idea or sensation, and never shrinks back to its former dimensions.’ This brief encounter with Jennifer and her mother has definitely left an indelible mark in my memory.

Looking for tip for PSLE English Oral? Watch this video.

GP Sample Essay Paper

GP Sample Essay Paper 1 : Technology save lives every day. From seat belts and airbags to medical instruments like MRI and medical lasers. More often than not, people tend to take beneficial technology for granted and prefer to pontificate on issues like invasive technology, loss of privacy that comes with the prevalence of surveillance cameras and such. It is an undeniable fact that we as a society is increasingly dependent on technology. Gadgets like mobile phones, tablets have become omnipresent. Technology has come a long way in helping mankind. It has enabled mankind to be more efficient and more recently, in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, technology ranging from digital payments, telehealth to robotics. has played a pivotal role in reducing the spread of the coronavirus while helping businesses stay open. It has helped make our society more resilient in the face of pandemic and other threats. On the flip side, just as technology has been a boon for us. It has made us more vulnerable and in particular, reduced our privacy. Our over-reliance on technology could potentially have huge consequences if the very machines we rely on were to fail. Indeed, just as technology empowers us, it has also made us more at risk.

Source: CNET

Technology, particularly Artificial Intelligence has helped us greatly in our current fight to quell the Covid-19 pandemic. Healthcare facilities and technology companies here are tapping AI technology in the fight against the Covid-19 outbreak. Hospitals such as the National University Hospital (NUH) are using a clinical chat assistant smartphone app by Singapore AI startup Bot MD, which helps doctors and front-line healthcare workers stay abreast with the fast-changing information around Covid-19. The app uses AI to power its natural language interface and to extract clinical information from large swathes of content from different data sources. In doing so, whenever clinical staff requires an answer to questions like who’s on-call or guidelines on hospital-specific protocols, they can simply type a query (and the app) will instantly respond with the right answer. In addition to this, AI is also used in temperature screening here. The IHiS and local medical tech start-up KroniKare have developed a solution called iThermo that uses AI to spot febrile people in a crowd, reducing the need for a manual process. Evidently, AI is a highly effective technology to battle the Covid-19 pandemic.

Another aspect in which technology has greatly empowered man is in the area of the military. With the advancement of technology, militaries around the world; from the nuclear technology of the Cold War between this US and the Soviet Union to unmanned drones today. Militaries are quick to embrace those as not only do they help in reducing casualties, but they can also help commanders make better choices. One such case would be the usage of unmanned aerial drones in battlefields such as in Afghanistan by the US military and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) for surveillance and battle purposes. These drones provide real-time footages of the battlefield and can be used to launch missiles to aid soldiers. Attacks by drones have led to success in killing key extremist leaders in Pakistan as well as Afghanistan. Even on the groin, guns are more advanced with functions such as ‘corner shot’ where a soldier can bend his weapon so as to look around corners without putting himself In the line of fire. This would most certainly be an impossibility in the past. Technology has greatly enabled the military to carry out tasks easily although ironically their reliance on it could also be their undoing.

Our over-reliance on technology has increased our vulnerability. Apps like the SafeEntry digital check-in system, which logs employees’ and visitors’ entry into businesses to facilitate contact tracing, can potentially help trace and prevent new clusters from developing.At the same time, this check-in system logs the names, NRIC/FINs and mobile numbers of individuals visiting hotspots, workplaces of permitted services,in order to facilitate contact tracing efforts. As we all should know, apps on cell phones emit a constant trail of longitude and latitude readings, making it possible for app developers to follow consumers through time and space. Location data are often triangulated with other, seemingly innocuous slivers of personal information.

In conclusion, it is beyond doubt that technology is greatly beneficial and Man should be truly grateful for that. But it is also important to acknowledge that we have become more vulnerable to new threats from cyber-attacks to solar flares.

For more sample essays, sign up for our free membership. You can also reach out to our team of ex-MOE or full time tutors for online tuition. Sign up today and enjoy a discount code for our online tuition.

O’levels Paper 1

O’levels Paper 1 Student’s Model Essay:

Question: Write about an occasion when an inconsiderate act leads to drastic consequences

“Bang, bang, bang, buzzzzz,” the sound of the relentless pounding of the drill reverberated throughout the walls of my flat. The cacophonous sound had jolted me from my deep slumber. Bleary-eyed, I dragged myself towards the main door, hoping to find out who or what is causing such a din.

I opened my door and was livid to find that the entire common corridor has been filled with tools, wooden planks, stacks of old newspaper and old furniture. A long extension ladder was also placed against the parapet. It turns out that my new neighbour Dashen has been using the common corridor like his own workshop.

“Oh my gosh! Can you please STOP?!” I yelled, my voice shooting up 50 octaves, my eyes flashing angrily.

“Why are you making so much noise so early in the morning? Don’t you know you cannot block the common corridor? You are obstructing everyone. This is very inconsiderate!” I hollered again. Rage gripping me and anger flooding through my veins.

Dashen darted me a baleful look, flicked his cigarette, turned his head, walked back into his flat, ignoring me completely.

At this point, I could feel a vein popped out in my neck, my jaw thrust forward with indignation. I stomped back to my room to put on some proper clothing so that I can confront him.

Suddenly, an acrid smell hit my nostrils. It was smoky campfire-ish smell. I raced to the front door only to find thick gray smoke billowing in. Like a monstrous beast, it wolfed everything in its way. Nothing was spared. Flames ripped across the ceiling as if they had been shot from a flamethrower. At the corner of my eyes, I caught a glimpse of a burning cigarette that landed on the pile of newspaper.

 

Immediately, everything clicked.

Our inconsiderate new neighbour, Dashen, must have flung his cigarette onto the newspapers that he had left outside. The cigarette must have stabbed into a tottering stack of cardboard boxes intermixed with old newspapers and an old cabinet that was missing a leg. The suffocating smoke jolted me to my senses. I quickly reached for my phone and dialled 995. As I put down the phone, a thought struck me like lightning. Oh no! I have to alert Auntie Wong, our recently widowed, octogenarian neighbour who is living alone. I knocked furiously and frantically at her door. Just as I thought, she was home and had just woken up too.

“We have to get out of here! There is a fire!” I bellowed. Mrs Wong was hyperventilating. I took her hand and helped her out of her flat. There was choking smoke, so black and thick that it seemed you could grab it by the handful. Suddenly, out of nowhere, I heard a lot sound. Crack! Thud! The ladder that Dashen left outside the corridor had fallen, landing on Mrs Wong’s left leg. Gasping for breath, I mustered all my strength and pushed the ladder away, almost tripping over the debris. I picked the frail Mrs Wong up and carried her down the stairs. Just as we were able to go down the stairs, a loud boom echoed behind me and we were hurled forward. At this point, the firemen had arrived and managed to bring the both of us to safety.

After battling with the fire for close to four hours, the fire was finally extinguished. The police had also arrived and told us that there some flammable substances such as cleaning agents and electronic items in the old cabinet that Dashen had left outside the corridor. Dashen was also questioned by the authorities and the police took him away to assist with further investigation.

Dashen’s terribly selfish, horribly reckless act endangered everyone. Lives could have been lost because of such thoughtless act and careless oversights. Dashen’s inconsiderate act has started a disastrous fire which took have taken a heavy toll on innocent lives.

What exactly do examiners look for in a well written narrative or personal recount essay?

Content: Students need a well-organized story will have all three parts, and the ideas will be presented in a clear and logical way. Your story must be credible and not too far-fetched.

Language: To get The paragraphs will be set appropriately, with colons and semicolons used as they should, and the ideas presented should be easy to connect and understand, making it a smooth read for the reader.

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live without our smart phones

 

Do you know that the average Singaporean spend over 12 hours on their gadgets daily?

There is no other contraption in the world today that is more indispensable to our lives than the smartphone. While it was previously just a means of voice communication, a (frowned-upon) appendage for the selfie narcissists, the mobile phone is now ever more instrumental to our lives, particularly so in this post-covid world where social distancing and telecommuting has become the norm.

According to a research report by consultancy Ernst & Young, nearly 80 percent of the 1,000 Singaporeans they interviewed on mobile usage shared that they check their phones before and after sleeping. Our dependency on our smartphone has been further accelerated by the current pandemic.

To avoid catching the insidious bug, we contact trace with our phones. When confined at home, we isolate ourselves from others and swipe left on our phones hoping to meet some virtual Mr or Miss Right for companionship. To protect ourselves and prevent germs from spreading, we pay with our phones. The Singapore government is on a fervent digital frenzy to get all their hawkers to jump on the Smart Nation bandwagon, extending a Hawker’s Productivity Grant capped at $5000 over three years just so that Hawkers can all be ready to accept digital payments in time for the fourth industrial revolution. According to CNBC, it is expected that nearly three quarters of the world will use just their smartphones by 2025.

Of course, with the increasing popularity of mobile phones among people comes the sharply contested debate as to whether or not we can live without our phones. Are we becoming slaves to our devices? While there is a valid case to be argued that cell phones are evidently addictive and can lead to possible anti-social behaviours and even social disorientation. Some pundits have even coined the phrase “Nomophobia” an abbreviation for “no-mobile-phone phobia” to describe a condition where people have an extreme dependency on their phones and develop anxiety when they cannot use their phones.

Even our last line of defence, our seniors have fallen prey to the cell phone. The silver generation previously heralded as the naysayers of mobile phones and social media have become new converts of the technology. Under the circuit breaker, some seniors have been embracing technology that was previously unfamiliar to them and they are bonding with their loved ones through their phones. According to IMDA, 76 percent of seniors in Singapore in 2019, a significant leap from just 18 percent in 2013.

Will we ever be freed from the clutches of that alluring glass body with OLED display and facial recognition? Wait, let me Google it on my phone.

This essay is written by Young Writers of The Learning Space. For more O’levels and A’levels model essays, sign up for our membership and you will receive a special Welcome Package with compliments.