It is no secret that IB students in Singapore have been performing well above expectations for the last few years.

In the year 2021, over 50% of Singapore IB students (133 out of 238) are perfect scorers. This means that these students are getting a total of 45 points out of 45 points  with 42 points generated across the 6 subjects and 3 bonus points derived from Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay.)

A survey by Crimson Education reveals that the acceptance rate of IB students into Ivy League universities is up to 18% higher than the total population acceptance rate. Although there are no officially published IBDP cut-off points for ivy league universities, there have been general feedback and academic reviews on how IB scores fare in the Harvard enrolment process. To stand a chance in getting into Ivy League Schools like Harvard, IBDP students must score at least 38 points and have an immaculate portfolio which reflects their leadership qualities, sporting achievements, together with a letter of recommendation (LOR).

Where Can I Study The IB in Singapore?

There are close to 30 schools in Singapore offering the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) from local schools like Singapore Sports School, SOTA, ACSI, SJI to International schools like Australia International School, Tanglin to United World College.

Even preschools like Etonhouse have started a full IB programme from IB Primary Years (PYP) to Middle Years (MYP) to IBDP. Students are now able to study the two-year pre-university course at Etonhouse in their Orchard Campus.

List of schools that offer the IBDP programmes in Singapore with Annual Tuition Fees* (Please contact the respective educational institutions to get the latest tuition fees)

ACS (International) Singapore

IBDP offered since: 2006

Annual tuition fees: $25,410 – $36,960

Anglo-Chinese School (Independent)

IBDP offered since: 2005

Annual tuition fees: $26,400

Australian International School, Singapore

IBDP offered since: 2010

Annual tuition fees: $42,852

Canadian International School (Lakeside Campus)

IBDP offered since: 2002

Annual tuition fees: $40,900

 

 

 

Chatsworth International School (Bukit Timah Campus)

IBDP offered since: 2004

Annual tuition fees: $32,788

 

Dover Court International School

IBDP offered since: 2017

Annual tuition fees: $33,855

 

Dulwich College (Singapore)

IBDP offered since: 2017

Annual tuition fees: $46,840

 

GEMS World Academy, Singapore

IBDP offered since: 2016

Annual tuition fees: $40,640

 

GESS

IBDP offered since: 2006

Annual tuition fees: $34,810

 

GIIS SMART Campus

IBDP offered since: 2005

Annual tuition fees: $18,945

 

Hillside World Academy

IBDP offered since: 2007

Annual tuition fees: $33,900

 

Hwa Chong International School (HCIS)

IBDP offered since: 2008

Annual tuition fees: $28,890

 

ISS International School Singapore (High School)

IBDP offered since: 2000

Annual tuition fees: $38,647

 

Madrasah Aljunied Al-Islamiah

IBDP offered since: 2018

Annual tuition fees: N/A

 

Nexus International School (Singapore)

IBDP offered since: 2008

Annual tuition fees: $40,338

 

NPS International School

IBDP offered since: 2010

Annual tuition fees: $24,900

 

One World International School (OWIS)

IBDP offered since: 2019

Annual tuition fees: $20,136

 

Overseas Family School

IBDP offered since: 1994

Annual tuition fees: $41,000

 

School of The Arts Singapore (SOTA)

IBDP offered since: 2010

Annual tuition fees: $27,600 (international students)

 

Singapore Sports School (SSP)

IBDP offered since: 2013

Annual tuition fees: N/A

 

St Francis Methodist School

IBDP offered since: 2019

Annual tuition fees: $20,709

 

St Joseph’s Institution

IBDP offered since: 2008

Annual tuition fees: $26,400 (international students)

 

St. Joseph’s Institution International

IBDP offered since: 2007

 

Annual tuition fees: $34,058

Stamford American International School

IBDP offered since: 2014

Annual tuition fees: $42,590

 

Tanglin Trust School

IBDP offered since: 2009

Annual tuition fees: $41,067

 

United World College of South East Asia (UWCSEA), Dover Campus

IBDP offered since: 1977

Annual tuition fees: $40,125

United World College of South East Asia (UWCSEA), East Campus

IBDP offered since: 2012

Annual tuition fees: $40,125

 

Click here to see List of IB Schools in Singapore

At the Learning Space, our team of school teachers and tutors can guide you or your child in their journey towards IBDP excellence. We have a strong team of current IB tutors and MOE trained teachers who are ready to support your child in their learning journey. For tuition on Language Literature, Economics, Business Management to Chinese, get in touch with us today.

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Cut Off Points for JC in 2022

 

The 2021 GCE O-Level results is scheduled to be released somewhere between Wednesday, 12 January and Friday, 14 January 2022. Some students are thinking of entering Polytechnics, others are hoping to go to Junior Colleges. For students who are thinking of entering Junior Colleges, it is important to know consider your options carefully. 

What should you do after you received your O’levels results?

Your form teachers will hand you a JAE (Joint Admissions Exercise) booklet and this booklet will provide more information on entry to JC, Millennia Institute, Polytechnics and ITEs. 

What is the admission criteria for Junior College?

To qualify for a Junior College, you need to have an aggregate of no more than 20. (L1R5) Your L1 can be English or Higher Language Mother Tongue (MTL) and you need to add a R1 (which can come from Any 1 of these subjects: Humanities, Higher Art, Higher Music, Malay (Special Programme), Chinese (Special Programme), Bahasa Indonesia, R2 will be a Math or Science subject and R3 can be another science subject or the subjects in R1, the R4 and R5 can be any O’levels subjects except Religious Knowledge. 

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Click here for link to JAE admissions website. 

So you got 20 and below for L1R5, now what?

The first question that pops in your head will be “What are the cut-off points for Junior Colleges in 2022?” This information has yet be to be released and vary from year to year. However, most students will take reference from the cut off points from the previous year as an indicator of their standing. This is a relatively good gauge because most JC maintain their “rankings” for the past few years, with exception of Eunoia Junior College. EJC whose cut off points in 2018 was 10, 11, on par with Temasek Junior College but in 2021, Eunoia Junior College’s cut off point shoot up to 7 (same as traditionally top colleges like Victoria Junior College and National Junior College). This is not surprising, given the fact that the dominant student base of EJC hails from IP schools like Catholic High, Singapore Chinese Girls and CHIJ St Nicholas Girls. 

What are the top 5 Junior Colleges in Singapore?

The top 5 or actually 6 junior colleges (three JCs share the same cut off points) in Singapore ranked according to their cut off points is presented below. The JC Cut Off Points in 2021 (according to MOE) for the top five junior colleges are all unsurprisingly below ten. They include:

  1. Hwa Chong Institution (Cut off Points for Science 4, Art 5)
  2. Raffles Institution (Cut off Points for Science 4, Art 5)
  3. Nanyang Junior College (Cut off Points for Science 6, Art 6)
  4. Eunoia Junior College, National Junior College (Cut off Points for Science 7, Art 8)
  5. Victoria Junior College (Cut off Points for Science 7, Art 8)

How do you choose a Junior College that suits you? 

We interviewed our students from different JCs and this is what they have to say.

1) CCA

“I was lucky enough to get my top choices. I was considering RI and HCI as my first choices, but I ended up choosing RI because of my CCA. Through the help of my seniors, I went for a CCA tryout session at RI and found out more their CCAs, training programme et cetera. I was also attracted by the “prestige” of the RI name.” said Zarmin, Year 5 student from RI 

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2) Family Influence

“My dad was from ACJC and he met my mother there. Naturally, it was their first choice for me since I was from ACS and all.” said Christopher Gomez, Graduate from ACJC. 

3) School Culture 

“I chose VJ over HCI even though I could qualify for both due to the school culture. I felt that for some reason, VJC’s performing arts culture beckons to me more and it helps that my friends were going there too. ” said Tan JY, who chose the drama elective programme in VJC.

It is paramount to note that the cut-off points do not reflect the quality of the JCs and their programmes. Going to top ranking colleges do not promise top A’Levels results. In fact, top colleges give students more independence and ‘free rein’ compared to the middle or lower ranking colleges. According to MOE and SEAB, “(they) encourage students to continue choosing JCs based on each school’s distinctive programmes, CCAs (co-curricular activities) and school culture – factors that can further develop their strengths and interests,”. 

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What happens if I cannot make it to the top 5 Junior Colleges?

Que será, será, whatever will be, will be. Fortunately, your choice of a Junior College will not define you. Going to a “lower tiered” junior college, going MI or taking A’levels as a private candidate, ultimately leads you to A’levels and your future depends on yourself. Take heart, the outrageously talented Asian Comedian from The Daily Show, Ronny Chieng was a graduate from Pioneer Secondary School and Pioneer Junior College. He eventually took a law degree in Australia and is currently working side by side with top comedians like Trevor Noah. Kid, The world is your oyster. 

Whatever JC you choose, the ultimate challenge of A’Levels awaits in less than two years. To help you prepare effectively for your A’levels, we are offering a one time trial of just $60 for all Year 5 or JC 1 students (Usual Price $90 per lesson valid till 30 June 2022) for our General Paper Online Tuition. You will gain access to our team of top JC Tutors and Lecturers, receive model essays and exclusive notes. Whatsapp or email us today. For existing secondary students who are keen to continue GP tuition with us, you will enjoy a special discount for our GP classes, watch out for our eDM in January 2022. 

Click here to find out more about H1, H2 and H3 subjects at A’Levels

 

 

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GRAMMAR QUIZ: 
Should you say “I am wearing an or a uniform.” ?

Read on for the answer below. 

When do you use An or A?
Simply put, you use ‘An’ when initials sound a e i o u. In uniform ‘u’ sounds like ‘you’ which starts with ‘y’ not ‘u’ sound like the one in an umbrella. Hence a uniform is correct.’
How can you improve on your Editing? 
In O’levels English Paper 1 (1128), Editing is a weighty section worth 10 marks. Many students are unable to score a good grade for this section because they may not be familiar with some key rules of grammar. Read on for some quick tips for editing and common preposition mistakes. 

To get professional help for English Tuition in Singapore, reach out to us and our team of tutors (MOE Trained Teachers, Full Time Tutors and University Undergrads) today. For a limited time, you can get a trial lesson for online Secondary English Tuition at just $40 onwards.  

Tips for Editing at O’Levels

(i) Prepositions of Time 

When do you use ‘In’ , ‘On’ and ‘At’ ?

In

  • Parts of days

Morning / Afternoon

E.g. It is 7am in the morning. 

  • Months

E.g. My birthday is in July

  • Years

E.g. I was born in the year 2005.

  • Centuries 

E.g. As we usher in the 21st Century …

On

  • Holidays that end with ‘day’

E.g. I was born on National Day.

  • Days of the week

E.g. I forgot that my homework was due on Monday. 

  • Days of the month 

E.g. Singapore’s National Day is on 9th August.

  • Dates 
At

  • Holidays without ‘day’ (Lunar New Year, Deepavali) 

E.g. I am always busy at Deepavali because I have many relatives to visit. 

  • Time (Midnight, Noon, 10am, 1pm) 

E.g.  I am going to meet my best friend for lunch at 1.30pm. 

Prepositions of Place >>  in, on, and at.

In

    • Neighbourhoods

    E.g. I live in Clementi 

    • Cities

    E.g. I work in London

    • Countries

    (China)

    E.g. My family lives in China 

On

    • Streets, Avenues

    E.g. I live on the Sixth Avenue 

    • Islands

    I live on Sentosa Island

    1. Large Vehicles or surfaces 

    E.g. Train, Bus, Ship

    E.g. I lost my wallet on the train 

At

    • Addresses

     

    E.g. I live at 210 Riverdale Street 

    1. Specific Location 

    E.g. I am at home now

For a limited time only, we are offering a special promotion for Secondary 1 to 5 O’levels Express Online Tuition at just $40 for one class (50% off). You will gain access to notes and coaching by our team of ex and current MOE Teachers. Whatsapp us or email us today.

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PSLE Math

 

The recent 2021 PSLE Math paper has done it again! Every year, students and parents take to the internet to consult one another on how to solve a particular math question. This year is no exception.

 

Question involved: (source: Mothership and CNA)

 

Question from my whatspp:

 

*Apparently, there’s different versions of the question. A reader alerted us.

 

I admit. I tried to used algebra to solve it. It didn’t work.

I wanted to text the person who shared the question with me that there must be some other information or that the question is incomplete. Otherwise, how can i not solve it?

My second attempt at the question taught me something. Sometimes, it the user that complicates things. The Singapore Math Model uses Bar Modeling as a pictorial method to solve word problems.

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Solution based on my whatsapp message:

Please take note that diagram is not drawn to the correct scale. (It doesn’t need to)

And that both Helen and Ivan have the same number of coins.

From the above bar model, we can deduce that it does not matter how many coins do each Helen or Ivan has nor does the question ask the student to solve for the total number of coins.

What we should take note of is that as Ivan has 40 more 20 cent coins than Helen, it would mean that Helen would have 40 more 50 cent coins than Ivan. (Only 2 type of coins involved here, 20 cent and 50 cent)

From here, we know that having more 50 cent coins would mean Helen has more money and by $12 (Difference of 50 cent and 20 cent X Difference of 40 coins)

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Since Helen has more 50 cent coins, Ivan’s coins would weight lesser than Helen’s. And what’s the difference? (2.7 g X Difference of 40 coins) = 108g difference. 

Therefore, mass of Ivan’s coins = 1.134kg – 108g = 1.026kg.

 

My math tutor used to tell me that it’s alright when I cannot mange to solve certain questions in the paper. I was quite puzzled by what he said. Now, I seem to realize what he meant. He was saying that as his assumption was that I was able to complete the math papers with above 75% grades on a consistent basis. And that if there were any questions that I could not solve, it still would not amount to my grade being less than A1. 

However, it has always been my goal to get 100% for my math papers. In reality, when you aim for 100, you may fall short a little (careless mistakes, silly errors, etc). But chances are that you would still get the highest possible grade of A1 or AL1. 

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So I ask myself: “What would my overall math grade be, if I failed to answer Helen’s and Ivan’s coins question”?

 

To better prepare for the challenges of PSLE Math, we provide Online Math Tuition (4 x 1.5 hours a month). All lessons are conducted online in small groups. Contact us today for more details!

 

Click here to register.

Who should sign up?

Primary 5 and Primary 6 PSLE taking students who are keen to ace their Math papersducation Programme (English, Maths and General Ability). Whatsapp us for more details. 

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THE GIFTED EXAMINATION PROGRAMME (GEP) Sample Test Papers is available for download for all members of The Learning Space. Please sign up here and indicate your interest in getting a sample question for the GEP Sample Test Paper (English).

We provide GEP preparation class online (3 Days) either group or individual 1 on 1. Our GEP Preparation Programme will give your children the critical insights and familiarise your child with question types commonly seen during the GEP round 1 Screening Exercise. Run twice each year, this highly sought after popular programme is conducted by our team of specialist teachers and provide practical strategies and techniques to excel in the MOE’s highly competitive 2-stage selection exercise.

What is the GEP Programme?

GEP Screening Exercise is held annually for all Primary 3 students in Singapore.

There are two stages:

Stage 1: Screening

Stage 2: Selection

At the Learning Space, we provide GEP Preparatory Tuition for students who are keen to have a head start. Students can choose a small group class or engage a 1 to 1 GEP Prep Teacher to guide them in this exciting endeavour. Lessons are available online or in-person and conducted by our team of highly experienced GEP Teachers. 

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How can you prepare your child for the GEP Identification Exercise?

Is a gifted child a product of nature or nurture? Since time immemorial, this has been a highly controversial subject. Evidence from many recent source points to the superior character of most of the homes or families as a strong contributing factor to the high standing of these boys and girls whose I.Qs are 130 or higher. According to the University of Chicago Press Journals, other than genetics, nurture is an important consideration and there has been a consideration of methods of training gifted children. 

To help parents better prepare for the challenges of the GEP Prep test, we provide a 16 hours of intensive preparation (6 lessons of 3 hours each) to tackle the commonly tested components of the GEP Screening Exercise. All lessons are conducted online in small groups. Contact us today for more details!

GEP Boot Camp

Click here to register.

Who should sign up?

Primary 2 and Primary 3 students who are keen to gain exposure to sample questions of the Gifted Education Programme (English, Maths and General Ability). Whatsapp us at 9364 6977 for more details. 

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Singapore Secondary School Cut-off Points 2021 

 

 

In a blink of an eye, soon it will be time for this year’s Primary Six students to go for their PSLE exams in September to October 2021. Click here to download the latest PSLE schedule 2021 from MOE.  In view of the recent changes to the PSLE scoring system to AL 1 to AL8, it is critical that students and parents examine closely which secondary schools they would like to go.

Many questions come to mind, “How to choose a secondary school that suits my children? What are the cut off points? What are the academic programmes to consider? Does the school offer DSA admission? What are the niche programmes offered by the school? Any affiliations to Junior Colleges?” The list of questions that parents ponder on goes on and on endlessly. 

Our PSLE series of articles will give you key insights such as providing a list of the latest secondary school cut-off points so that you can guide your child to make his/her plans. 

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PSLE Scoring System 

Four important things you MUST know when it comes to choosing a suitable secondary school

1) Watch out for Affiliation Bonus  

Schools that are affiliated with one another offer a lower cut-off point to students from affiliated Primary Schools. These schools with exception of Nanyang High and Hwa Chong Institution, are typically missionary schools like SJI Junior, CHIJ Kellock Convent, CHIJ Katong, MGS, and ACS et cetera. 

2) Choosing a school with the ‘right’ school culture. What is a SAP school? 

Special Assistance Plan (SAP) known in Chinese as 新加玻特选中学 / 特选学校, caters to students who excel in both their Mother Tongue and the English language. At the moment, the SAP schools only cater to the Mandarin mother tongue language.

SAP schools tend to place a higher priority on Chinese bi-cultural education and most offer special programmes like Bicultural Studies and tend to attract more students from China. Historically, the SAP schools normally attract the Top 10% – 20% of each PSLE cohort.

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This is especially relevant for students who took Higher Chinese at PSLE,

According to MOE, Students who obtained Distinction/Merit/Pass in HCL and a PSLE Score of 14 or better (i.e. PSLE Score ≤ 14) at PSLE will be eligible for posting advantage to SAP schools. However, under the new scoring system, students with better PSLE scores will be posted first to SAP schools, event if they DID NOT take HCL. In the scenario where students have the same PSLE score, those with better HCL grades will be posted to SAP schools first. 

 

There are a total of 26 SAP schools (both primary and secondary) in Singapore. Secondary SAP schools include highly established school Nan Chiau High, Chung Cheng (Main), Maris Stella High School, Anglican High School, CHIJ Saint Nicholas’ Girls, Nan Hua High School.   

 

3) Consider the IB Programme 

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Programme is another option for your child to consider. Embarking on the programme will eventually lead students to IBDP which is the equivalent of GCE A’levels. Most of the international schools in Singapore usually adopt the iGCSE and IB education programme. Students who choose the IB Programme will have the opportunity to enjoy a more holistic programme offering. Local schools like The Singapore Sports School, SOTA, MGS, SJI, ACS offers students IB programme. The Learning Space is a pioneer in IB and iGCSE tuition, our team of IB tutors are fully equipped and highly experienced in helping students achieve their ideal scores for the IB programme. It is important tot note that the IB curriculum places emphasis on the research processes of the students, as well as on their inquiry and problem-solving skills. Students will also have to work on programmes like the theory of knowledge essay and the individual extended essay, which are completed by students over a specified period of time under teacher supervision. 

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You can find out more about IB tuition and contact our IB tutors here

4) What is an IP Programme? 

Integrated Programme (IP) is a programme where the students do not take GCE O levels instead they will embark on a six-years education programme from secondary school to junior college, culminating with the GCE A-level exams. Therefore the programme is also known as the “choo-train”, where students who get into this programme will be automatically secured a spot in the respective JCs, without having to go through another examination. 

The list of IP schools in Singapore are Dunman High, River Valley High, MGS, Nanyang, Hwa Chong Institution, Raffles Girls School, Raffles Institution, Catholic High, Cedar Girls, National Junior College, Temasek Junior College and more.

INSIDERS’ TIPS: Advice for Parents 

Former HOD of Language Arts from a top IP school, Ms Melanie Chan shares that IP programme (at Year One and Two) emphasises more on the holistic development of students who exhibited higher academic competence. Instead of “chasing the curriculum” students are given the opportunity to explore in depth and alternative assessments. For instance, IP students in Raffles Girls School have the opportunity to learn how to write poems and biography. They learn how to create animations and get fully hands-on Applied Science concepts. IP schools also tend to attract former GEP gifted students because of their academic rigour. However, it is important for parents to note that IP schools can sometimes be regarded as an epitome of the pressure cooker system because the curriculum for IP school can get progressively demanding at the Upper Secondary Level as teachers start to prepare students for A’levels. Students who are self-directed learners will definitely thrive in an IP school environment. Like the IB students, IP students are also expected to take English Literature as part of their Language Arts programmes. Students who need tuition and guidance for IP Language Arts can contact our team of MOE tutors. 

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Cut-off points for Secondary School in 2021 

 See below for the affiliated points for the school. 

School   IP/IB SAP school Express Normal Academic Normal Technical  
Hwa Chong Institution Boys IP 4-7  
Raffles Girls’ School Girls IP   4-6  
Methodist Girls’ School Girls IP   4-6  
Nanyang Girls’ School Girls IP 4-8 /4-7  
Raffles Institution Boys IP   4-6  
Dunman High School Co-ed IP 4-8  
National Junior College Co-ed IP   5-7  
CHIJ St Nicholas Girls’ School Girls IP 4-7  
Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) Boys IP   4-7  
Catholic High School Boys IP 5-8  
Methodist Girls’ School Girls   6-8 /7-17  
Cedar Girls’ Secondary School Girls IP   4-8  
CHIJ St Nicholas Girls’ School Girls 5-8/5-14  
River Valley High School Co-ed IP 4-9  
Singapore Chinese Girls’ School Girls IP   4-8  
Singapore Chinese Girls’ School Girls   5-9 /8-17  
Victoria School Boys IP   5-8  
Catholic High School Boys 6-9/6-12  
Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) Boys   6-9/7-13  
Cedar Girls’ Secondary School Girls   4-9  
Paya Lebar Methodist Girls’ School Girls   8-11 /4-20 21-23 /21-25 25-28 /26-28  
St Joseph’s Institution Boys IP   4-8  
Temasek Junior College Co-ed IP   4-9  
Anderson Secondary School Co-ed   4-10 21-24 25-28  
CHIJ Toa Payoh Girls   6-10/7-20 21-24/21-25 25-30/27  
Victoria School Boys   6-9  
Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road) Boys   6-11/7-22 21-21/21-24 25-26/25-28  
Bukit Panjang Government High School Co-ed   6-11 21-22 25-26  
Nan Hua High School Co-ed 6-11  
St Joseph’s Institution Boys   5-10 /8-12  
Nan Chiau High School Co-ed 4-11  
Chung Cheng High School (Main) Co-ed 6-11  
Crescent Girls’ School Girls   6-11  
Fairfield Methodist School Co-ed   8-11 /8-20 21/21-24 25-27 /25-28  
St Andrew’s Secondary School Boys   7-10 /7-22 21-23 /21-25 25-26 /25-29  
St Margaret’s Secondary Girls   9-11 /9-20 21-22 /22-25 25-27 /25-28  
Swiss Cottage Secondary School Co-ed   4-11 21-22 25-26  
Chung Cheng High School (Yishun) Co-ed   6-11 21-23 25-27  
Anglican High School Co-ed 5-12  
Commonwealth Secondary School Co-ed   8-12 21-23 25-28  
Yishun Town Secondary School Co-ed   6-13 21-23 25-27  
CHIJ St Theresa’s Convent Girls   11-13/8-20 22-24/21-25 25-29/25-28  
Ngee Ann Secondary School Co-ed   5-12 /12-16 21-22 /21-25 25-26 /26-28  
CHIJ St Joseph’s Convent Girls   9-13/8-29 21-23/21-25 25-27/25-29  
Maris Stella High School Boys 7-12 /8-16  
Kuo Chuan Presbyterian Secondary School Co-ed   8-13 /11-20 21-24 /21-25  
Zhonghua Secondary School Co-ed   9-13 21-23 25-27  
Fuhua Secondary School Co-ed   6-13 21-23 25-28  
Presbyterian High School Co-ed   8-13 21-23 25-27  
Tanjong Katong Girls’ School Girls   5-13  
Xinmin Secondary School Co-ed   8-14 21-23 25-27  
Clementi Town Secondary School Co-ed   8-14 21-24 25-28  
Riverside Secondary School Co-ed   6-14 21-23 25-27  
Temasek Secondary School Co-ed   7-13 21-22 25-27  
Holy Innocents’ High School Co-ed   10-15 /11-22 21-23/21-25 25-26 /25-28  
Kranji Secondary School Co-ed   10-14 21-23 25-27  
Tanjong Katong Secondary School Co-ed   9-14  
Dunman Secondary School Co-ed   9-14 21-23 25-27  
Edgefield Secondary School Co-ed   7-14 21-22 25-27  
St Patrick’s School Boys   10-14 /12-20 21-22 /21-24 25-27 /26-28  
Ang Mo Kio Secondary School Co-ed   11-16 21-24 25-28  
Bukit Batok Secondary School Co-ed   11-15 21-23 25-28  
Geylang Methodist School Co-ed    11-15/13-21 21-23 /21-25 25-26 /25-29  
Jurong Secondary School Co-ed   8-16 21-23 25-28  
CHIJ Katong Convent Girls   11-15/11-20 21-24/21-25 25-30/26-28  
Evergreen Secondary School Co-ed   9-15 21-23 25-27  
St Anthony’s Canossian Secondary School Girls   11-15 /10-22 21-24 / 21-25 25-27 /25-28  
Bowen Secondary School Co-ed   10-16 21-24 25-27  
Gan Eng Seng School Co-ed   7-15 21-23 25-26  
Hua Yi Secondary School Co-ed   10-16 21-23 25-29  
St Gabriel’s Secondary School Boys   10-17 /13-22 21-23 /22-25 25-28 /26-27  
St Hilda’s Secondary School Co-ed   12-15 /13-22 21-23 /21-25 25-28 /26-28  
Pei Hwa Secondary School Co-ed   11-16 21-24 25-26  
West Spring Secondary School Co-ed   10-17 21-23 25-26  
Hai Sing Catholic School Co-ed   10-16 21-24 25-28  
Ahmad Ibrahim Secondary School Co-ed   10-17 21-24 25-28  
Mayflower Secondary School Co-ed   12-17 21-24 25-28  
Deyi Secondary School Co-ed   13-17 21-25 25-28  
Queensway Secondary School Co-ed   11-17 21-24 25-27  
Pasir Ris Secondary School Co-ed   11-18 21-24 25-28  
Unity Secondary School Co-ed   13-18 21-24 25-28  
Pasir Ris Crest Secondary School Co-ed   9-17 21-25 25-28  
Woodlands Ring Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-24 25-28  
Bedok View Secondary School Co-ed   13-18 21-24  
Chua Chu Kang Secondary School Co-ed   216 171 137  
Beatty Secondary School Co-ed   12-18 21-25 25-27  
Yuan Ching Secondary School Co-ed   8-19 21-25 25-28  
Compassvale Secondary School Co-ed   11-18 21-24 25-27  
Kent Ridge Secondary School Co-ed   10-19 21-24 25-30  
North Vista Secondary School Co-ed   12-18 21-24 25-27  
Orchid Park Secondary School Co-ed   12-19 21-24 25-28  
Bukit View Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-25 26-30  
Peirce Secondary School Co-ed   12-19 22-25 26-29  
Zhenghua Secondary School Co-ed   12-20 21-24 25-27  
Bedok South Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-25 25-28  
Greendale Secondary School Co-ed   8-18 21-23 25-27  
Hillgrove Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-24 25-28  
Meridian Secondary School Co-ed   15-19 21-24 25-27  
Woodgrove Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-23 25-27  
Jurong West Secondary School Co-ed   10-18 21-24 25-28  
Montfort Secondary School Boys   15-20 /13-21 21-25 /23-25 25-28 /26-28  
Tampines Secondary School Co-ed   13-19 21-25 25-28  
Christ Church Secondary School Co-ed   207 166 109  
Yishun Secondary School Co-ed   207 164 109  
Seng Kang Secondary School Co-ed   13-19 21-24 25-27  
Admiralty Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-24 25-28  
Naval Base Secondary School Co-ed   11-20 21-24 25-28  
Hougang Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-25 26-27  
Punggol Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-24 25-27  
Regent Secondary School Co-ed   15-21 21-25  
Jurongville Secondary School Co-ed   16-20 21-25 25-30  
Westwood Secondary School Co-ed   11-22 21-25 25-28  
Greenridge Secondary School Co-ed   195 156 126  
Canberra Secondary School Co-ed   11-22 21-24 25-29  
New Town Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-25 21-25  
Juying Secondary School Co-ed   12-21 21-25 25-28  
Pei Cai Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 22-25 26-29  
Queenstown Secondary School Co-ed   16-22 21-25 25-28  
Assumption English School Co-ed   10-22 22-25 25-29  
Bartley Secondary School Co-ed   13-22 21-25 25-28  
Bedok Green Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-25 25-28  
Bendemeer Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-29  
Boon Lay Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 101  
Broadrick Secondary School Co-ed   7-22 21-25 25-27  
Bukit Merah Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Changkat Changi Secondary School Co-ed   13-22 21-25  
Damai Secondary School Co-ed   15-22 21-25 25-28  
Dunearn Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-30  
East Spring Secondary School Co-ed   12-22 22-25 25-28  
Fajar Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-30  
Fuchun Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 100  
Guangyang Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 21-25 26-29  
Junyuan Secondary School Co-ed   17-22 21-25 25-28  
Loyang View Secondary School Co-ed   15-21/13-22 22-25/23-25 26-28/26-28  
Manjusri Secondary School Co-ed   15-21 /13-22 22-25 /23-25 26-28 /26-28  
Marsiling Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-30  
Northbrooks Secondary School Co-ed   12-22 21-25 25-28  
Northland Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 22-25 26-28  
Outram Secondary School Co-ed   4-22 22-25 26-30  
Ping Yi Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 108  
Sembawang Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Serangoon Garden Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-28  
Serangoon Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 22-25 25-28  
Springfield Secondary School Co-ed   10-22 21-25 25-28  
Tanglin Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 100  
Teck Whye Secondary School Co-ed   6-22 21-25 25-29  
Whitley Secondary School Co-ed   7-22 21-25 26-29  
Woodlands Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Yio Chu Kang Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 22-25 25-28  
Yuhua Secondary School Co-ed   14-22 21-25 25-30  
Yuying Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 26-28   
Yusof Ishak Secondary School Co-ed          

Now that you can refer to this list of cut-off points, it’s time to decide which school you’d be applying for! Why not give yourself a headstart for your secondary school life with

  


Want more tips for PSLE or Oral? Watch our youtube video here

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It’s finally here! Your O’levels results are released! 

Despite the pandemic, students who sat for the O-level examinations last year set a roaring new record, with over 80 per cent of the cohort attaining five or more passes. 

What should you do next?

For those of you who passed with flying colours, congratulations. For some who didn’t do as well as you like and aren’t sure what to do next. Grab a treat and read on.

 

Let’s start by look at some numbers.

How did the previous batch of candidates fare? In 2019, 85.2 per cent secured five or more passes, while the 2020 batch scored 85.4 percent, up 0.4 percentage points from the previous year.

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The Ministry of Education (MOE) said that of the 20,300 candidates who sat for O’levels in 2019, 52 per cent were posted to the five polytechnics here. Another 38 per cent were given places in the junior colleges (JCs) and Millennia Institute, and about another 10 per cent were posted to the Institute of Technical Education.

What to do after O’levels?

 

First and foremost, be brave, if results aren’t what you expected or you have changed in the last year and now want something different, then do it! Defer entry, travel, change your course just don’t feel trapped into doing something that isn’t right for you. If your results did not meet your expectations, chin up. Take comfort in the fact that local universities will no longer factor in O-level results for admission come 2020. 

There could be a myriad of reasons why O’levels did not go well for you. Perhaps, you were too stressed or ran out of time. Move forward. You can’t change the past, but you can make things better. 

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Here are some paths you can consider after your O’levels results. 

1. Consider retaking your O-levels

If you have an ambition to fulfil, a dream course or school in mind that you cannot get into after trying all avenues (like appeals), give this option some serious thought. Being a year behind your peers is perfectly okay; everyone takes different paths and you’ll see this especially in polytechnics, where you can have classmates twice your age!

If you decide that this is what you want to pursue, please be reminded that you’ll have to pay to sit for the exams again. There are two ways to go about it:

  • Retaking your O-levels as a private candidate 
  • Retaking your O-levels in your current secondary school, which needs you to meet certain criteria

Retaking as a private candidate demands a lot of self-discipline. You’ll need to work out a studying schedule and keep to it, find out when and where to register for the papers and remember that the extra year you’re taking is an investment of your time and money. Sign up for our preparatory courses for O’levels English or tuition classes and let our tutors guide you. Most of our tutors are former teachers who will definitely be able to give you sound advice. Click here to reach us. 

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Alternatively, ITE offers a General Education (GE) Programme that offers part-time classes for English, Combined Humanities, Maths, Additional Mathematics, Double Sciences, Literature, Geography, Chinese, Tamil as well as Principles of Accounts. Classes run up to 32 weeks.

2. Take a Foundation Course

Private institutions here offer foundation diplomas that you can take—these last anywhere from 6-12 months full-time and give you the qualifications to progress to relevant diplomas offered by the same institution. Admission criteria is manageable for foundation diplomas; typically, all you’ll require is one GCE O-level pass and an O-level grade in English ranging from A1-D7, depending on the private institution.

Alternatively, you can explore pre-university entry programmes from private universities like Kaplan, MDIS, James Cook or even foundation year programmes abroad (which give you the chance to gain admission to overseas universities).

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Do note that this option can be very costly and in times of Covid-19 pandemic, it may not be the best approach at the moment. 

3. Slow down and study in a Centralised Institute

How about joining Millennia Institute (MI)?A Centralised Institute offers three-year pre-university courses under three streams. These are the arts and science streams that a typical JC offers as well as an additional commerce stream. 

The three years will give you a little more time to catch up on your studies and mug for the A-levels if you need some time (again, you’ll still need self-discipline). You’ll need an L1R4 of 5-20 to be eligible for admission.

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Specific subject requirements are as follows:

English Higher Chinese/Malay/Tamil Chinese/Malay/Tamil Chinese Basic/Malay Basic/Tamil Basic E Math/A Math
A1-C6 A1-E8 A1-D7 Merit/Pass A1-D7

 

If you find yourself unable to meet these requirements, Millennia Institute has a conditional student programme which will require you to re-sit for the relevant language and/or mathematics papers O-levels. You can re-take them for 2 times before your offer is revoked.

4. Consider enrolling for Poly Early Admissions Exercise

You can consider studying for a NITEC or Higher NITEC in ITE, before applying for a place in a Polytechnic via the Early Admissions Exercise (EAE). The EAE is a centralised aptitude-based admissions exercise, which allows students to apply for and receive conditional offers for admission to polytechnics prior to receiving their final grades.

This will be a longer route that will require a lot of resilience, but there are many who have taken it before you and succeeded. It’s also a suitable option if you’ve already set your heart on a polytechnic course, or have narrowed down an area of interest. You might need to submit portfolios and undergo interviews and aptitude tests, so start preparing early!

Hopefully, this article clears your doubts and let us link you up with a team of best tutors to help you fulfil your dreams. We are currently offering a trial lesson for private candidates. Email us your interest today.

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father's day

How did Father’s Day come about?

More than a century ago, an American woman, Sonora Smart Dodd of Spokane, sat in church listening to a Mother’s Day sermon and felt strangely detached. She was brought up by her father as her mother had died in childbirth. A sense of indignance surged within her and she decided she wanted to designate a day for her dad, William Jackson Smart. Dodd’s father, a Civil War veteran, had taken the responsibility of singlehandedly raising her and his other five children.

Unfortunately, not everyone can share her sentiment.

Elon Musk, for one, calls his father ‘a terrible human being’. The CEO of Tesla and SpaceX is not a fan of his father and even forbids his children from meeting his father (who was said to have killed three men who broke into his home and married his stepdaughter who is forty years younger than him.)

Admittedly, there are mixed messages are everywhere when it comes to the paternal figure. For some adults raised by single mothers, the holiday conjures painful moments when their fathers were AWOL. According to the National Retail Federation, spending for Father’s Day is estimated at around $15 billion compared to $25 billion spent on Mother’s Day.

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Why doesn’t Father’s Day get as much respect as Mother’s Day?

The answer is a question of simple math. Traditionally, most men simply don’t invest a high percentage of their waking hours with their children compared to women. The last boomer generation of men often are breadwinners who delegate domestic duties to their wives and don’t invest emotionally with their children.

In The Father Factor from National Fatherhood Initiative, the writer sagely shares the concept of a love bank. Coming from a financial background, the writer talks about how important it is to “invest” in your child’s life and how critical it is for dads to make regular, substantial, and consistent “deposits” in their children’s relationship “bank accounts.”

If you have not made these deposits to your children’s love bank, you could end up with conversations that sound something like this…

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(Scene—You rush into the lobby of the ‘First National Bank of Your 15-year-old Daughter’s Heart’ and quickly approach her window.)

Your Daughter: Good afternoon. How may I help you?

You: Hi. I need make a big withdrawal fast!

Your Daughter: Ok, sir. No problem. Could you please let me see some ID?

You: Sure.(You hand her a copy of her birth certificate where you are listed as “Father.”)

Your Daughter: Everything looks in order, Dad. Please wait just a minute while I check your account.(She turns away from you but then gets a strange look on her face.)

You: Is there a problem?

Your Daughter: Yes, sort of. I clearly see that you opened an account here a long time ago, but it doesn’t appear to have a sufficient balance for you to make a big withdrawal. When was the last time that you made a deposit?

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You: Well, I don’t remember. I guess it’s been a while. You know, I have been very busy working and stuff like that. But, my wife has been making lots of deposits. Seems like every time I turn around she is heading here. Since we are married, can’t I just make a withdrawal from her account?

Your Daughter: Dad, no you can’t because we don’t offer joint accounts here.

You: Oh yeah…That’s right…I remember hearing that. What about a loan? Can I get one of those?

Your Daughter: I’m sorry…We don’t offer loans either. You can only withdraw what you have deposited.(You start to get a bit upset…)You: Well that just doesn’t seem fair! I clearly have an account. And, well, I need to make a withdrawal. Can’t you make an exception? After all, I am DAD.

Your Daughter: Dad. I am sorry. I just can’t help you…(You are becoming more upset…)

You: Well, doggone it, I am not going to take no for answer.(Your daughter gets a concerned and stern look on her face and you can see her reaching under the counter to push the button for security.)

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Your Daughter: As I said, I can’t help you. You knew the rules when you opened the account. How can you expect to withdraw funds that you didn’t deposit? That’s just not the way it works here. All you had to do was make consistent deposits. Even small ones would have been fine because “interest”—your interest—would have compounded these deposits substantially over time. Taking deposits that don’t belong to you is, well, robbery. So, I need to ask you to leave now. Or, do I need to call security?

How can fathers make a change?

Our current generation of modern fathers is already leading this Dad-volution in fatherhood. Some men are fiercely progressive and believe in being a nurturing influence in their kids’ lives.

In our tiny Singapore, we are seeing a surge in a breed of “progressive dads”. A strong tribe of men, who makes the effort in making sure they deposit emotionally to their children’s emotional banks. Forty-two-year-old Technopreneur Jay Huang , a father of twins, is proud to be part of this Dad-volution. Growing up without the presence of a strong father figure, Jay is committed to making a difference. He is the family’s chef, driver and music tutor – all in one. Jay makes it a point to put his children first. Being a music aficionado himself, he goes to Violin lessons with his son and learns together with his son. At home, he helps his children with their music homework. At night, before the children sleeps, Jay would play a round of UNO cards with his children and hopes to make this a nightly ritual. He would then burn the midnight oil so as to ensure that his own work is in order.

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At the other end of Singapore, Bobby Sim, 40, is a stay-at-home father who’s opted to take the road less travelled – by staying at home to take care of his five-year-old daughter, while his wife goes to work. He says, “I believe modern fathers want to be great parents. And other than breastfeeding, dads can do practically everything the mum can do, and sometimes even better. (There shouldn’t be any) gender stereotyping.”

Coincidentally, both Huang and Sim grew up without a father by their side. Because of that, both said that they are inspired to become the fatherly figure they themselves never had, for their children.

Indeed, this modern generation of fathers has greatly outdone their predecessors.

As we celebrate Father’s Day this weekend, let’s all remind one another the importance of saving (emotionally) for a rainy day.

Bond with your children today, learn to play nursery rhymes together here or download a free printable and spend some quality time with your young ones.

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iGCSE Business Studies

A mere five years ago, tuition for iGCSE subjects like Economics, Business Studies and IB Economics, Business Management was almost unheard of. Fast forward to today, with the growing popularity of International Baccalaureate programmes in Singapore, more students have sent in requests for tuition for subjects like IB Business Managements and iGCSE Business Studies.

A recent survey conducted revealed that The Business Studies IGCSE and International Baccalaureate Business Management, are increasingly becoming two of the popular and (pragmatic) humanities courses that some international students tend to gravitate towards. The survey conducted amongst international schools students in Singapore (Canadian International School, Australian International School, United World College, Tanglin Trust, Overseas Family School, Dulwich College). Some students who choose Economics or Business studies often cite it as a highly practical humanities subject that widen their world view and give them good insights to how the real world operates compared to traditional humanities like geography and history.

On the other spectrum, GCE O’levels offers Economics and Business Studies only at few selected schools like Outram Secondary and Temasek Secondary. Students taking the O’level pathway in Singapore has to choose a humanities subject to major in when they approach the end of secondary two. Most schools will offer social studies and another humanities (like history, geography, literature and accounting) as an elective for students to choose. The subjects available will range from factors like school’s chosen niche or if the school has enough teachers that can teach that subject. The choice of doing Business Studies or Economics as electives are very rare, most secondary schools student end up taking subjects like geography and history.

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What do students learn in Business Studies?

In IGCSE Business Studies, students will be exposed to the fundamentals of business topics that will helps them develop their critical understanding of organisations, the markets they serve and the process of adding value. This will involve consideration of the management of organisations and in particular the process of decision-making in a dynamic business world.

Students will also study business behaviour from the perspective of different stakeholders including customers, managers, shareholders and employees. Students will be aware of the economic, environmental, ethical, legal, social and technological issues associated with business activity. Business Studies draws on a variety of disciplines which are interrelated.

How will students be assessed?
Paper 1 – Short answers and structured data responses (1 hour 30 minutes) 50% of final marks.
Paper 2 – Four questions based on a case study (1 hour 30 minutes) 50% of final marks.

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Although Business Studies may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but few can deny that it is a rather pragmatic humanities subject. If you have already chosen iGCSE Business Studies as your major, you can reach out to our strong team of Business Lecturers and Tutors from international schools that can help you succeed. Our iGCSE Business Studies tuition are available online and face-to-face, do contact us here.

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