It is no secret that IB students in Singapore have been performing well above expectations for the last few years.

In the year 2021, over 50% of Singapore IB students (133 out of 238) are perfect scorers. This means that these students are getting a total of 45 points out of 45 points  with 42 points generated across the 6 subjects and 3 bonus points derived from Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay.)

A survey by Crimson Education reveals that the acceptance rate of IB students into Ivy League universities is up to 18% higher than the total population acceptance rate. Although there are no officially published IBDP cut-off points for ivy league universities, there have been general feedback and academic reviews on how IB scores fare in the Harvard enrolment process. To stand a chance in getting into Ivy League Schools like Harvard, IBDP students must score at least 38 points and have an immaculate portfolio which reflects their leadership qualities, sporting achievements, together with a letter of recommendation (LOR).

Where Can I Study The IB in Singapore?

There are close to 30 schools in Singapore offering the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) from local schools like Singapore Sports School, SOTA, ACSI, SJI to International schools like Australia International School, Tanglin to United World College.

Even preschools like Etonhouse have started a full IB programme from IB Primary Years (PYP) to Middle Years (MYP) to IBDP. Students are now able to study the two-year pre-university course at Etonhouse in their Orchard Campus.

List of schools that offer the IBDP programmes in Singapore with Annual Tuition Fees* (Please contact the respective educational institutions to get the latest tuition fees)

ACS (International) Singapore

IBDP offered since: 2006

Annual tuition fees: $25,410 – $36,960

Anglo-Chinese School (Independent)

IBDP offered since: 2005

Annual tuition fees: $26,400

Australian International School, Singapore

IBDP offered since: 2010

Annual tuition fees: $42,852

Canadian International School (Lakeside Campus)

IBDP offered since: 2002

Annual tuition fees: $40,900

 

 

 

Chatsworth International School (Bukit Timah Campus)

IBDP offered since: 2004

Annual tuition fees: $32,788

 

Dover Court International School

IBDP offered since: 2017

Annual tuition fees: $33,855

 

Dulwich College (Singapore)

IBDP offered since: 2017

Annual tuition fees: $46,840

 

GEMS World Academy, Singapore

IBDP offered since: 2016

Annual tuition fees: $40,640

 

GESS

IBDP offered since: 2006

Annual tuition fees: $34,810

 

GIIS SMART Campus

IBDP offered since: 2005

Annual tuition fees: $18,945

 

Hillside World Academy

IBDP offered since: 2007

Annual tuition fees: $33,900

 

Hwa Chong International School (HCIS)

IBDP offered since: 2008

Annual tuition fees: $28,890

 

ISS International School Singapore (High School)

IBDP offered since: 2000

Annual tuition fees: $38,647

 

Madrasah Aljunied Al-Islamiah

IBDP offered since: 2018

Annual tuition fees: N/A

 

Nexus International School (Singapore)

IBDP offered since: 2008

Annual tuition fees: $40,338

 

NPS International School

IBDP offered since: 2010

Annual tuition fees: $24,900

 

One World International School (OWIS)

IBDP offered since: 2019

Annual tuition fees: $20,136

 

Overseas Family School

IBDP offered since: 1994

Annual tuition fees: $41,000

 

School of The Arts Singapore (SOTA)

IBDP offered since: 2010

Annual tuition fees: $27,600 (international students)

 

Singapore Sports School (SSP)

IBDP offered since: 2013

Annual tuition fees: N/A

 

St Francis Methodist School

IBDP offered since: 2019

Annual tuition fees: $20,709

 

St Joseph’s Institution

IBDP offered since: 2008

Annual tuition fees: $26,400 (international students)

 

St. Joseph’s Institution International

IBDP offered since: 2007

 

Annual tuition fees: $34,058

Stamford American International School

IBDP offered since: 2014

Annual tuition fees: $42,590

 

Tanglin Trust School

IBDP offered since: 2009

Annual tuition fees: $41,067

 

United World College of South East Asia (UWCSEA), Dover Campus

IBDP offered since: 1977

Annual tuition fees: $40,125

United World College of South East Asia (UWCSEA), East Campus

IBDP offered since: 2012

Annual tuition fees: $40,125

 

Click here to see List of IB Schools in Singapore

At the Learning Space, our team of school teachers and tutors can guide you or your child in their journey towards IBDP excellence. We have a strong team of current IB tutors and MOE trained teachers who are ready to support your child in their learning journey. For tuition on Language Literature, Economics, Business Management to Chinese, get in touch with us today.

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“Should I choose JC over Poly?” is THE perennial question that all secondary students (or their parents) have to ask themselves.

Despite the pandemic, the 2021 batch of Sec Four and Sec Five students achieved the best O-level results in at least 30 years with close to 90% of the students attaining 5 or more passes. This is indeed impressive and reflects strongly the resilience of our students in Singapore.

According to the Ministry Of Education, over 50 percent of the 20,300 students who took O’levels in 2020, were posted to the five polytechnics. Another close to 40 percent of these O’levels holders were allocated slots in Junior Colleges and MI. Other 10 percent were posted to ITE. 

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In every cohort of graduating Secondary 4 and 5 students, there will always be some students who have long decided on a polytechnic education. More often than not, this group of students are aware of their career aspirations and are keen to go to poly to further their goals vocationally. They are almost certain of their career path and see poly as a natural stepping stone that provides key industrial insights to their future career. Typically, these students are motivated and have the blessings of their parents, and they would choose to go for Early Admissions Exercise (known as EAE or the DSA route to Poly) so as to secure their ideal course before the release of O’levels results. 

There exists another group (which arguably may make up the majority) where these Secondary Four students would hover on ambivalence, and would keep their options open till they receive their results. Like most typical sixteen and seventeen year olds, they are uncertain about their career path and see the O’level results as a push and determinant nudge towards their future. They adopt ‘see-how’ mindset and will only decide and take the final plunge when they received their results.

Whichever group you belong too, in today’s blog post, let’s look at the advantages of choosing JC over Poly vice versa. 

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Advantages of choosing JC  Disadvantages of choosing JC
1) Shorter duration – Two years over three years at a Polytechnic.  1) Potentially overwhelming workload – the JC Workload can be challenging and the pressure is on to perform above or within expectations within a span of less than two years for a high key national examination. 
2) A more direct route and better chance to enter local universities – With the current pandemic, it has become increasingly more appealing and competitive for students to stay in Singapore. Statistically, over 70 percent or more JC students get into Uni while 30% Poly students get into Uni (Local). There is admittedly more certainty to get into the local Universities when you go to JC.  2) No real change in the environment. The school rules continue, CCA remains similar and subjects available are still close to those offered in secondary. 
3) JC are more cost effective – It is cheaper (for Singaporeans especially). The cost of school fees for a non independent JC is less than $10 per month. School Fees for Polytechnic on the other hand is around $250 per month. Tuition grants are available for students. In addition to this, there is no need to factor in a ‘wardrobe budget’, in JC , you wear Uuniforms every day. Hurray for the budget and eco conscious. Another serious consideration that you need to have is that if you value a local University degree but have no budget to go overseas, JC is definitely a very attractive option. 3) Lack freedom, You feel ‘kiddie’ and a Fashionista nightmare – Unlike the Poly students, JC students can only wear their uniforms. Rules are stricter and you have your usual assembly and other familiar obligations. There are limited subjects to choose from and most are extensions from secondary school. 

 

4) It is similar to secondary school and you do not have to decide on your preferred course yet. A plus for students who have yet to decide on their career routes, JC would ‘buy more time’.  4) You will need to take another major national exams, the A’Levels in less than two years. You are stuck with subjects like GP which have gained the notoriety of being ‘hard to pass/score.’ Just as you are ‘recovering’ from O’Levels, you are ushered into another round of preparation for yet another National Exam. 

Choosing Poly or Jc is definitely a daunting task. Admittedly, It may seem more prestigious ‘to go on the ‘Junior College’ route, which is a path that leads to the studies of even more theoretical applications. However, it is pivotal to consider your own strengths and weaknesses before making the decisions. Do not choose a route because your best friend is choosing it. Talk to your seniors, parents or the school career counsellors, whatever your choice may be, our team of former and current MOE teacher tutors will be able to support you in your journey to academic excellence. Our online GP tuition starts from just $35 onwards. Get in touch with us today and let us support you in your academic endeavours with the best tutors in Singapore. 

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Cut Off Points for JC in 2022

 

The 2021 GCE O-Level results is scheduled to be released somewhere between Wednesday, 12 January and Friday, 14 January 2022. Some students are thinking of entering Polytechnics, others are hoping to go to Junior Colleges. For students who are thinking of entering Junior Colleges, it is important to know consider your options carefully. 

What should you do after you received your O’levels results?

Your form teachers will hand you a JAE (Joint Admissions Exercise) booklet and this booklet will provide more information on entry to JC, Millennia Institute, Polytechnics and ITEs. 

What is the admission criteria for Junior College?

To qualify for a Junior College, you need to have an aggregate of no more than 20. (L1R5) Your L1 can be English or Higher Language Mother Tongue (MTL) and you need to add a R1 (which can come from Any 1 of these subjects: Humanities, Higher Art, Higher Music, Malay (Special Programme), Chinese (Special Programme), Bahasa Indonesia, R2 will be a Math or Science subject and R3 can be another science subject or the subjects in R1, the R4 and R5 can be any O’levels subjects except Religious Knowledge. 

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Click here for link to JAE admissions website. 

So you got 20 and below for L1R5, now what?

The first question that pops in your head will be “What are the cut-off points for Junior Colleges in 2022?” This information has yet be to be released and vary from year to year. However, most students will take reference from the cut off points from the previous year as an indicator of their standing. This is a relatively good gauge because most JC maintain their “rankings” for the past few years, with exception of Eunoia Junior College. EJC whose cut off points in 2018 was 10, 11, on par with Temasek Junior College but in 2021, Eunoia Junior College’s cut off point shoot up to 7 (same as traditionally top colleges like Victoria Junior College and National Junior College). This is not surprising, given the fact that the dominant student base of EJC hails from IP schools like Catholic High, Singapore Chinese Girls and CHIJ St Nicholas Girls. 

What are the top 5 Junior Colleges in Singapore?

The top 5 or actually 6 junior colleges (three JCs share the same cut off points) in Singapore ranked according to their cut off points is presented below. The JC Cut Off Points in 2021 (according to MOE) for the top five junior colleges are all unsurprisingly below ten. They include:

  1. Hwa Chong Institution (Cut off Points for Science 4, Art 5)
  2. Raffles Institution (Cut off Points for Science 4, Art 5)
  3. Nanyang Junior College (Cut off Points for Science 6, Art 6)
  4. Eunoia Junior College, National Junior College (Cut off Points for Science 7, Art 8)
  5. Victoria Junior College (Cut off Points for Science 7, Art 8)

How do you choose a Junior College that suits you? 

We interviewed our students from different JCs and this is what they have to say.

1) CCA

“I was lucky enough to get my top choices. I was considering RI and HCI as my first choices, but I ended up choosing RI because of my CCA. Through the help of my seniors, I went for a CCA tryout session at RI and found out more their CCAs, training programme et cetera. I was also attracted by the “prestige” of the RI name.” said Zarmin, Year 5 student from RI 

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2) Family Influence

“My dad was from ACJC and he met my mother there. Naturally, it was their first choice for me since I was from ACS and all.” said Christopher Gomez, Graduate from ACJC. 

3) School Culture 

“I chose VJ over HCI even though I could qualify for both due to the school culture. I felt that for some reason, VJC’s performing arts culture beckons to me more and it helps that my friends were going there too. ” said Tan JY, who chose the drama elective programme in VJC.

It is paramount to note that the cut-off points do not reflect the quality of the JCs and their programmes. Going to top ranking colleges do not promise top A’Levels results. In fact, top colleges give students more independence and ‘free rein’ compared to the middle or lower ranking colleges. According to MOE and SEAB, “(they) encourage students to continue choosing JCs based on each school’s distinctive programmes, CCAs (co-curricular activities) and school culture – factors that can further develop their strengths and interests,”. 

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What happens if I cannot make it to the top 5 Junior Colleges?

Que será, será, whatever will be, will be. Fortunately, your choice of a Junior College will not define you. Going to a “lower tiered” junior college, going MI or taking A’levels as a private candidate, ultimately leads you to A’levels and your future depends on yourself. Take heart, the outrageously talented Asian Comedian from The Daily Show, Ronny Chieng was a graduate from Pioneer Secondary School and Pioneer Junior College. He eventually took a law degree in Australia and is currently working side by side with top comedians like Trevor Noah. Kid, The world is your oyster. 

Whatever JC you choose, the ultimate challenge of A’Levels awaits in less than two years. To help you prepare effectively for your A’levels, we are offering a one time trial of just $60 for all Year 5 or JC 1 students (Usual Price $90 per lesson valid till 30 June 2022) for our General Paper Online Tuition. You will gain access to our team of top JC Tutors and Lecturers, receive model essays and exclusive notes. Whatsapp or email us today. For existing secondary students who are keen to continue GP tuition with us, you will enjoy a special discount for our GP classes, watch out for our eDM in January 2022. 

 

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GRAMMAR QUIZ: 
Should you say “I am wearing an or a uniform.” ?

Read on for the answer below. 

When do you use An or A?
Simply put, you use ‘An’ when initials sound a e i o u. In uniform ‘u’ sounds like ‘you’ which starts with ‘y’ not ‘u’ sound like the one in an umbrella. Hence a uniform is correct.’
How can you improve on your Editing? 
In O’levels English Paper 1 (1128), Editing is a weighty section worth 10 marks. Many students are unable to score a good grade for this section because they may not be familiar with some key rules of grammar. Read on for some quick tips for editing and common preposition mistakes. 

To get professional help for English Tuition in Singapore, reach out to us and our team of tutors (MOE Trained Teachers, Full Time Tutors and University Undergrads) today. For a limited time, you can get a trial lesson for online Secondary English Tuition at just $40 onwards.  

Tips for Editing at O’Levels

(i) Prepositions of Time 

When do you use ‘In’ , ‘On’ and ‘At’ ?

In

  • Parts of days

Morning / Afternoon

E.g. It is 7am in the morning. 

  • Months

E.g. My birthday is in July

  • Years

E.g. I was born in the year 2005.

  • Centuries 

E.g. As we usher in the 21st Century …

On

  • Holidays that end with ‘day’

E.g. I was born on National Day.

  • Days of the week

E.g. I forgot that my homework was due on Monday. 

  • Days of the month 

E.g. Singapore’s National Day is on 9th August.

  • Dates 
At

  • Holidays without ‘day’ (Lunar New Year, Deepavali) 

E.g. I am always busy at Deepavali because I have many relatives to visit. 

  • Time (Midnight, Noon, 10am, 1pm) 

E.g.  I am going to meet my best friend for lunch at 1.30pm. 

Prepositions of Place >>  in, on, and at.

In

    • Neighbourhoods

    E.g. I live in Clementi 

    • Cities

    E.g. I work in London

    • Countries

    (China)

    E.g. My family lives in China 

On

    • Streets, Avenues

    E.g. I live on the Sixth Avenue 

    • Islands

    I live on Sentosa Island

    1. Large Vehicles or surfaces 

    E.g. Train, Bus, Ship

    E.g. I lost my wallet on the train 

At

    • Addresses

     

    E.g. I live at 210 Riverdale Street 

    1. Specific Location 

    E.g. I am at home now

For a limited time only, we are offering a special promotion for Secondary 1 to 5 O’levels Express Online Tuition at just $40 for one class (50% off). You will gain access to notes and coaching by our team of ex and current MOE Teachers. Whatsapp us or email us today.

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How do I get into a polytechnic after my N’Levels? What are my options?

Option 1. Apply to a Polytechnic via DPP

According to the Ministry of Education, N’level students can go for the Direct-Entry-Scheme to Polytechnic Programme (DPP). This is one of the two Normal (Academic) through-train pathways that were launched in 2013. It enables Secondary 4 N(A) students who are interested to go to Polytechnic but may not be meeting their academic targets as yet, to be admitted directly into a 2-year Higher Nitec programme at the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) without having to sit for the O-Level examinations or undergo a Nitec programme.

Students would then need to complete the course with the minimum required Grade Point Average (GPA, typically around 2.5 to qualify for Polytechnic Admission) so that they can be guaranteed a place in a polytechnic diploma course which in turn will be mapped to their Higher Nitec course.

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Who can apply ?

Secondary 4 N(A) students who have taken the most recent N-Level examinations as a school candidate. The DPP application starts right after receiving the N’levels results and will go on for around a week or so. Students can find out more by clicking this link. The posting results will typically be released after Christmas.

How do I know if I can go for DDP?

 According to MOE, Secondary 4 Normal (Academic) students who scored an aggregate of not more than 19 points in English language, mathematics and the best three subjects, and at least a Grade 5 for all subjects used in the computation of this five-subject score, can apply for the Direct Entry Scheme to Polytechnic Programme (DPP). Students can also enter the PFP (Poly foundation Programme) which is a year long foundation programme conducted at polytechnics which serve to prepare students for entry to diploma courses. Students need to pass all the modules in the PFP programme to move on to a diploma course in polytechnic.  

 

Option 2: Continue to Secondary 5

Why should your child continue to promote to Sec 5? In 2021, over 79.2 per cent of the close to 9500 candidates were able to move on to Sec 5. Students who wish to go to Junior Colleges or Millennia Institute(three year Pre University course) will typically choose this route. 

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What are the advantages and disadvantages of going to Secondary 5?

 

Advantages of going Sec 5

  1. Students will still stand a chance to continue their aspirations of going to a Junior College or taking the A’Levels.
  2. Secondary 5 helps to buy time. It is the most direct route for students to pursue when they are still uncertain of their career options. Entering a polytechnic when you are not certain of what course you want can potentially result in three years of ‘hell and misery’, although for some, having a new social circle may mitigate this. 
Disadvantages of going Sec 5
1) You have to relearn the O’levels syllabus in just one year or less. Unless you have the help of a qualified tutor, it will be extremely challenging to take on the O’levels on your own. The syllabus are largely different and students have to re-learn many subjects. 
2) What if you fail the O’levels?
Some students who have gone on to Secondary 5, realised the leap in academic expectations and simply cannot manage the stress and subjects. Having just taken the N’levels last year and to pursue another major National Levels such as O-Levels so soon is a potentially tedious process, especially in this pandemic.

With the release of O-levels results, happening on 10 January 2022, more N’levels students and their O’levels counterparts will be facing this beckoning conundrum. Whether it’s polytechnic or to continue with Secondary 5, students are well advised to attend virtual open houses and go for career fairs in order to obtain an inkling of their career directions.

Our team of qualified tutors and MOE trained teachers are standing by to give students academic support and strategies. From now till 31 January, all O’levels and N’Levels 2021 candidates are eligible to sign up for our online English and Math tuition courses at just $40 (usual price $60) for a trial lesson. 
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PSLE Math

 

The recent 2021 PSLE Math paper has done it again! Every year, students and parents take to the internet to consult one another on how to solve a particular math question. This year is no exception.

 

Question involved: (source: Mothership and CNA)

 

Question from my whatspp:

 

*Apparently, there’s different versions of the question. A reader alerted us.

 

I admit. I tried to used algebra to solve it. It didn’t work.

I wanted to text the person who shared the question with me that there must be some other information or that the question is incomplete. Otherwise, how can i not solve it?

My second attempt at the question taught me something. Sometimes, it the user that complicates things. The Singapore Math Model uses Bar Modeling as a pictorial method to solve word problems.

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Solution based on my whatsapp message:

Please take note that diagram is not drawn to the correct scale. (It doesn’t need to)

And that both Helen and Ivan have the same number of coins.

From the above bar model, we can deduce that it does not matter how many coins do each Helen or Ivan has nor does the question ask the student to solve for the total number of coins.

What we should take note of is that as Ivan has 40 more 20 cent coins than Helen, it would mean that Helen would have 40 more 50 cent coins than Ivan. (Only 2 type of coins involved here, 20 cent and 50 cent)

From here, we know that having more 50 cent coins would mean Helen has more money and by $12 (Difference of 50 cent and 20 cent X Difference of 40 coins)

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Since Helen has more 50 cent coins, Ivan’s coins would weight lesser than Helen’s. And what’s the difference? (2.7 g X Difference of 40 coins) = 108g difference. 

Therefore, mass of Ivan’s coins = 1.134kg – 108g = 1.026kg.

 

My math tutor used to tell me that it’s alright when I cannot mange to solve certain questions in the paper. I was quite puzzled by what he said. Now, I seem to realize what he meant. He was saying that as his assumption was that I was able to complete the math papers with above 75% grades on a consistent basis. And that if there were any questions that I could not solve, it still would not amount to my grade being less than A1. 

However, it has always been my goal to get 100% for my math papers. In reality, when you aim for 100, you may fall short a little (careless mistakes, silly errors, etc). But chances are that you would still get the highest possible grade of A1 or AL1. 

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So I ask myself: “What would my overall math grade be, if I failed to answer Helen’s and Ivan’s coins question”?

 

To better prepare for the challenges of PSLE Math, we provide Online Math Tuition (4 x 1.5 hours a month). All lessons are conducted online in small groups. Contact us today for more details!

 

Click here to register.

Who should sign up?

Primary 5 and Primary 6 PSLE taking students who are keen to ace their Math papersducation Programme (English, Maths and General Ability). Whatsapp us for more details. 

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THE GIFTED EXAMINATION PROGRAMME (GEP) Sample Test Papers is available for download for all members of The Learning Space. Please sign up here and indicate your interest in getting a sample question for the GEP Sample Test Paper (English).

We provide GEP preparation class online (3 Days) either group or individual 1 on 1. Our GEP Preparation Programme will give your children the critical insights and familiarise your child with question types commonly seen during the GEP round 1 Screening Exercise. Run twice each year, this highly sought after popular programme is conducted by our team of specialist teachers and provide practical strategies and techniques to excel in the MOE’s highly competitive 2-stage selection exercise.

What is the GEP Programme?

GEP Screening Exercise is held annually for all Primary 3 students in Singapore.

There are two stages:

Stage 1: Screening

Stage 2: Selection

At the Learning Space, we provide GEP Preparatory Tuition for students who are keen to have a head start. Students can choose a small group class or engage a 1 to 1 GEP Prep Teacher to guide them in this exciting endeavour. Lessons are available online or in-person and conducted by our team of highly experienced GEP Teachers. 

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How can you prepare your child for the GEP Identification Exercise?

Is a gifted child a product of nature or nurture? Since time immemorial, this has been a highly controversial subject. Evidence from many recent source points to the superior character of most of the homes or families as a strong contributing factor to the high standing of these boys and girls whose I.Qs are 130 or higher. According to the University of Chicago Press Journals, other than genetics, nurture is an important consideration and there has been a consideration of methods of training gifted children. 

To help parents better prepare for the challenges of the GEP Prep test, we provide a 16 hours of intensive preparation (6 lessons of 3 hours each) to tackle the commonly tested components of the GEP Screening Exercise. All lessons are conducted online in small groups. Contact us today for more details!

GEP Boot Camp

Click here to register.

Who should sign up?

Primary 2 and Primary 3 students who are keen to gain exposure to sample questions of the Gifted Education Programme (English, Maths and General Ability). Whatsapp us at 9364 6977 for more details. 

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Singapore Secondary School Cut-off Points 2021 

 

 

In a blink of an eye, soon it will be time for this year’s Primary Six students to go for their PSLE exams in September to October 2021. Click here to download the latest PSLE schedule 2021 from MOE.  In view of the recent changes to the PSLE scoring system to AL 1 to AL8, it is critical that students and parents examine closely which secondary schools they would like to go.

Many questions come to mind, “How to choose a secondary school that suits my children? What are the cut off points? What are the academic programmes to consider? Does the school offer DSA admission? What are the niche programmes offered by the school? Any affiliations to Junior Colleges?” The list of questions that parents ponder on goes on and on endlessly. 

Our PSLE series of articles will give you key insights such as providing a list of the latest secondary school cut-off points so that you can guide your child to make his/her plans. 

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PSLE Scoring System 

Four important things you MUST know when it comes to choosing a suitable secondary school

1) Watch out for Affiliation Bonus  

Schools that are affiliated with one another offer a lower cut-off point to students from affiliated Primary Schools. These schools with exception of Nanyang High and Hwa Chong Institution, are typically missionary schools like SJI Junior, CHIJ Kellock Convent, CHIJ Katong, MGS, and ACS et cetera. 

2) Choosing a school with the ‘right’ school culture. What is a SAP school? 

Special Assistance Plan (SAP) known in Chinese as 新加玻特选中学 / 特选学校, caters to students who excel in both their Mother Tongue and the English language. At the moment, the SAP schools only cater to the Mandarin mother tongue language.

SAP schools tend to place a higher priority on Chinese bi-cultural education and most offer special programmes like Bicultural Studies and tend to attract more students from China. Historically, the SAP schools normally attract the Top 10% – 20% of each PSLE cohort.

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This is especially relevant for students who took Higher Chinese at PSLE,

According to MOE, Students who obtained Distinction/Merit/Pass in HCL and a PSLE Score of 14 or better (i.e. PSLE Score ≤ 14) at PSLE will be eligible for posting advantage to SAP schools. However, under the new scoring system, students with better PSLE scores will be posted first to SAP schools, event if they DID NOT take HCL. In the scenario where students have the same PSLE score, those with better HCL grades will be posted to SAP schools first. 

 

There are a total of 26 SAP schools (both primary and secondary) in Singapore. Secondary SAP schools include highly established school Nan Chiau High, Chung Cheng (Main), Maris Stella High School, Anglican High School, CHIJ Saint Nicholas’ Girls, Nan Hua High School.   

 

3) Consider the IB Programme 

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Programme is another option for your child to consider. Embarking on the programme will eventually lead students to IBDP which is the equivalent of GCE A’levels. Most of the international schools in Singapore usually adopt the iGCSE and IB education programme. Students who choose the IB Programme will have the opportunity to enjoy a more holistic programme offering. Local schools like The Singapore Sports School, SOTA, MGS, SJI, ACS offers students IB programme. The Learning Space is a pioneer in IB and iGCSE tuition, our team of IB tutors are fully equipped and highly experienced in helping students achieve their ideal scores for the IB programme. It is important tot note that the IB curriculum places emphasis on the research processes of the students, as well as on their inquiry and problem-solving skills. Students will also have to work on programmes like the theory of knowledge essay and the individual extended essay, which are completed by students over a specified period of time under teacher supervision. 

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You can find out more about IB tuition and contact our IB tutors here

4) What is an IP Programme? 

Integrated Programme (IP) is a programme where the students do not take GCE O levels instead they will embark on a six-years education programme from secondary school to junior college, culminating with the GCE A-level exams. Therefore the programme is also known as the “choo-train”, where students who get into this programme will be automatically secured a spot in the respective JCs, without having to go through another examination. 

The list of IP schools in Singapore are Dunman High, River Valley High, MGS, Nanyang, Hwa Chong Institution, Raffles Girls School, Raffles Institution, Catholic High, Cedar Girls, National Junior College, Temasek Junior College and more.

INSIDERS’ TIPS: Advice for Parents 

Former HOD of Language Arts from a top IP school, Ms Melanie Chan shares that IP programme (at Year One and Two) emphasises more on the holistic development of students who exhibited higher academic competence. Instead of “chasing the curriculum” students are given the opportunity to explore in depth and alternative assessments. For instance, IP students in Raffles Girls School have the opportunity to learn how to write poems and biography. They learn how to create animations and get fully hands-on Applied Science concepts. IP schools also tend to attract former GEP gifted students because of their academic rigour. However, it is important for parents to note that IP schools can sometimes be regarded as an epitome of the pressure cooker system because the curriculum for IP school can get progressively demanding at the Upper Secondary Level as teachers start to prepare students for A’levels. Students who are self-directed learners will definitely thrive in an IP school environment. Like the IB students, IP students are also expected to take English Literature as part of their Language Arts programmes. Students who need tuition and guidance for IP Language Arts can contact our team of MOE tutors. 

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Cut-off points for Secondary School in 2021 

 See below for the affiliated points for the school. 

School   IP/IB SAP school Express Normal Academic Normal Technical  
Hwa Chong Institution Boys IP 4-7  
Raffles Girls’ School Girls IP   4-6  
Methodist Girls’ School Girls IP   4-6  
Nanyang Girls’ School Girls IP 4-8 /4-7  
Raffles Institution Boys IP   4-6  
Dunman High School Co-ed IP 4-8  
National Junior College Co-ed IP   5-7  
CHIJ St Nicholas Girls’ School Girls IP 4-7  
Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) Boys IP   4-7  
Catholic High School Boys IP 5-8  
Methodist Girls’ School Girls   6-8 /7-17  
Cedar Girls’ Secondary School Girls IP   4-8  
CHIJ St Nicholas Girls’ School Girls 5-8/5-14  
River Valley High School Co-ed IP 4-9  
Singapore Chinese Girls’ School Girls IP   4-8  
Singapore Chinese Girls’ School Girls   5-9 /8-17  
Victoria School Boys IP   5-8  
Catholic High School Boys 6-9/6-12  
Anglo-Chinese School (Independent) Boys   6-9/7-13  
Cedar Girls’ Secondary School Girls   4-9  
Paya Lebar Methodist Girls’ School Girls   8-11 /4-20 21-23 /21-25 25-28 /26-28  
St Joseph’s Institution Boys IP   4-8  
Temasek Junior College Co-ed IP   4-9  
Anderson Secondary School Co-ed   4-10 21-24 25-28  
CHIJ Toa Payoh Girls   6-10/7-20 21-24/21-25 25-30/27  
Victoria School Boys   6-9  
Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road) Boys   6-11/7-22 21-21/21-24 25-26/25-28  
Bukit Panjang Government High School Co-ed   6-11 21-22 25-26  
Nan Hua High School Co-ed 6-11  
St Joseph’s Institution Boys   5-10 /8-12  
Nan Chiau High School Co-ed 4-11  
Chung Cheng High School (Main) Co-ed 6-11  
Crescent Girls’ School Girls   6-11  
Fairfield Methodist School Co-ed   8-11 /8-20 21/21-24 25-27 /25-28  
St Andrew’s Secondary School Boys   7-10 /7-22 21-23 /21-25 25-26 /25-29  
St Margaret’s Secondary Girls   9-11 /9-20 21-22 /22-25 25-27 /25-28  
Swiss Cottage Secondary School Co-ed   4-11 21-22 25-26  
Chung Cheng High School (Yishun) Co-ed   6-11 21-23 25-27  
Anglican High School Co-ed 5-12  
Commonwealth Secondary School Co-ed   8-12 21-23 25-28  
Yishun Town Secondary School Co-ed   6-13 21-23 25-27  
CHIJ St Theresa’s Convent Girls   11-13/8-20 22-24/21-25 25-29/25-28  
Ngee Ann Secondary School Co-ed   5-12 /12-16 21-22 /21-25 25-26 /26-28  
CHIJ St Joseph’s Convent Girls   9-13/8-29 21-23/21-25 25-27/25-29  
Maris Stella High School Boys 7-12 /8-16  
Kuo Chuan Presbyterian Secondary School Co-ed   8-13 /11-20 21-24 /21-25  
Zhonghua Secondary School Co-ed   9-13 21-23 25-27  
Fuhua Secondary School Co-ed   6-13 21-23 25-28  
Presbyterian High School Co-ed   8-13 21-23 25-27  
Tanjong Katong Girls’ School Girls   5-13  
Xinmin Secondary School Co-ed   8-14 21-23 25-27  
Clementi Town Secondary School Co-ed   8-14 21-24 25-28  
Riverside Secondary School Co-ed   6-14 21-23 25-27  
Temasek Secondary School Co-ed   7-13 21-22 25-27  
Holy Innocents’ High School Co-ed   10-15 /11-22 21-23/21-25 25-26 /25-28  
Kranji Secondary School Co-ed   10-14 21-23 25-27  
Tanjong Katong Secondary School Co-ed   9-14  
Dunman Secondary School Co-ed   9-14 21-23 25-27  
Edgefield Secondary School Co-ed   7-14 21-22 25-27  
St Patrick’s School Boys   10-14 /12-20 21-22 /21-24 25-27 /26-28  
Ang Mo Kio Secondary School Co-ed   11-16 21-24 25-28  
Bukit Batok Secondary School Co-ed   11-15 21-23 25-28  
Geylang Methodist School Co-ed    11-15/13-21 21-23 /21-25 25-26 /25-29  
Jurong Secondary School Co-ed   8-16 21-23 25-28  
CHIJ Katong Convent Girls   11-15/11-20 21-24/21-25 25-30/26-28  
Evergreen Secondary School Co-ed   9-15 21-23 25-27  
St Anthony’s Canossian Secondary School Girls   11-15 /10-22 21-24 / 21-25 25-27 /25-28  
Bowen Secondary School Co-ed   10-16 21-24 25-27  
Gan Eng Seng School Co-ed   7-15 21-23 25-26  
Hua Yi Secondary School Co-ed   10-16 21-23 25-29  
St Gabriel’s Secondary School Boys   10-17 /13-22 21-23 /22-25 25-28 /26-27  
St Hilda’s Secondary School Co-ed   12-15 /13-22 21-23 /21-25 25-28 /26-28  
Pei Hwa Secondary School Co-ed   11-16 21-24 25-26  
West Spring Secondary School Co-ed   10-17 21-23 25-26  
Hai Sing Catholic School Co-ed   10-16 21-24 25-28  
Ahmad Ibrahim Secondary School Co-ed   10-17 21-24 25-28  
Mayflower Secondary School Co-ed   12-17 21-24 25-28  
Deyi Secondary School Co-ed   13-17 21-25 25-28  
Queensway Secondary School Co-ed   11-17 21-24 25-27  
Pasir Ris Secondary School Co-ed   11-18 21-24 25-28  
Unity Secondary School Co-ed   13-18 21-24 25-28  
Pasir Ris Crest Secondary School Co-ed   9-17 21-25 25-28  
Woodlands Ring Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-24 25-28  
Bedok View Secondary School Co-ed   13-18 21-24  
Chua Chu Kang Secondary School Co-ed   216 171 137  
Beatty Secondary School Co-ed   12-18 21-25 25-27  
Yuan Ching Secondary School Co-ed   8-19 21-25 25-28  
Compassvale Secondary School Co-ed   11-18 21-24 25-27  
Kent Ridge Secondary School Co-ed   10-19 21-24 25-30  
North Vista Secondary School Co-ed   12-18 21-24 25-27  
Orchid Park Secondary School Co-ed   12-19 21-24 25-28  
Bukit View Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-25 26-30  
Peirce Secondary School Co-ed   12-19 22-25 26-29  
Zhenghua Secondary School Co-ed   12-20 21-24 25-27  
Bedok South Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-25 25-28  
Greendale Secondary School Co-ed   8-18 21-23 25-27  
Hillgrove Secondary School Co-ed   14-19 21-24 25-28  
Meridian Secondary School Co-ed   15-19 21-24 25-27  
Woodgrove Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-23 25-27  
Jurong West Secondary School Co-ed   10-18 21-24 25-28  
Montfort Secondary School Boys   15-20 /13-21 21-25 /23-25 25-28 /26-28  
Tampines Secondary School Co-ed   13-19 21-25 25-28  
Christ Church Secondary School Co-ed   207 166 109  
Yishun Secondary School Co-ed   207 164 109  
Seng Kang Secondary School Co-ed   13-19 21-24 25-27  
Admiralty Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-24 25-28  
Naval Base Secondary School Co-ed   11-20 21-24 25-28  
Hougang Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-25 26-27  
Punggol Secondary School Co-ed   15-20 21-24 25-27  
Regent Secondary School Co-ed   15-21 21-25  
Jurongville Secondary School Co-ed   16-20 21-25 25-30  
Westwood Secondary School Co-ed   11-22 21-25 25-28  
Greenridge Secondary School Co-ed   195 156 126  
Canberra Secondary School Co-ed   11-22 21-24 25-29  
New Town Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-25 21-25  
Juying Secondary School Co-ed   12-21 21-25 25-28  
Pei Cai Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 22-25 26-29  
Queenstown Secondary School Co-ed   16-22 21-25 25-28  
Assumption English School Co-ed   10-22 22-25 25-29  
Bartley Secondary School Co-ed   13-22 21-25 25-28  
Bedok Green Secondary School Co-ed   13-20 21-25 25-28  
Bendemeer Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-29  
Boon Lay Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 101  
Broadrick Secondary School Co-ed   7-22 21-25 25-27  
Bukit Merah Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Changkat Changi Secondary School Co-ed   13-22 21-25  
Damai Secondary School Co-ed   15-22 21-25 25-28  
Dunearn Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-30  
East Spring Secondary School Co-ed   12-22 22-25 25-28  
Fajar Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-30  
Fuchun Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 100  
Guangyang Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 21-25 26-29  
Junyuan Secondary School Co-ed   17-22 21-25 25-28  
Loyang View Secondary School Co-ed   15-21/13-22 22-25/23-25 26-28/26-28  
Manjusri Secondary School Co-ed   15-21 /13-22 22-25 /23-25 26-28 /26-28  
Marsiling Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-30  
Northbrooks Secondary School Co-ed   12-22 21-25 25-28  
Northland Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 22-25 26-28  
Outram Secondary School Co-ed   4-22 22-25 26-30  
Ping Yi Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 108  
Sembawang Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Serangoon Garden Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 25-28  
Serangoon Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 22-25 25-28  
Springfield Secondary School Co-ed   10-22 21-25 25-28  
Tanglin Secondary School Co-ed   188 152 100  
Teck Whye Secondary School Co-ed   6-22 21-25 25-29  
Whitley Secondary School Co-ed   7-22 21-25 26-29  
Woodlands Secondary School Co-ed   9-22 21-25 25-28  
Yio Chu Kang Secondary School Co-ed   16-21 22-25 25-28  
Yuhua Secondary School Co-ed   14-22 21-25 25-30  
Yuying Secondary School Co-ed   8-22 21-25 26-28   
Yusof Ishak Secondary School Co-ed          

Now that you can refer to this list of cut-off points, it’s time to decide which school you’d be applying for! Why not give yourself a headstart for your secondary school life with

  


Want more tips for PSLE or Oral? Watch our youtube video here

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It’s finally here! Your O’levels results are released! 

Despite the pandemic, students who sat for the O-level examinations last year set a roaring new record, with over 80 per cent of the cohort attaining five or more passes. 

What should you do next?

For those of you who passed with flying colours, congratulations. For some who didn’t do as well as you like and aren’t sure what to do next. Grab a treat and read on.

 

Let’s start by look at some numbers.

How did the previous batch of candidates fare? In 2019, 85.2 per cent secured five or more passes, while the 2020 batch scored 85.4 percent, up 0.4 percentage points from the previous year.

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The Ministry of Education (MOE) said that of the 20,300 candidates who sat for O’levels in 2019, 52 per cent were posted to the five polytechnics here. Another 38 per cent were given places in the junior colleges (JCs) and Millennia Institute, and about another 10 per cent were posted to the Institute of Technical Education.

What to do after O’levels?

 

First and foremost, be brave, if results aren’t what you expected or you have changed in the last year and now want something different, then do it! Defer entry, travel, change your course just don’t feel trapped into doing something that isn’t right for you. If your results did not meet your expectations, chin up. Take comfort in the fact that local universities will no longer factor in O-level results for admission come 2020. 

There could be a myriad of reasons why O’levels did not go well for you. Perhaps, you were too stressed or ran out of time. Move forward. You can’t change the past, but you can make things better. 

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Here are some paths you can consider after your O’levels results. 

1. Consider retaking your O-levels

If you have an ambition to fulfil, a dream course or school in mind that you cannot get into after trying all avenues (like appeals), give this option some serious thought. Being a year behind your peers is perfectly okay; everyone takes different paths and you’ll see this especially in polytechnics, where you can have classmates twice your age!

If you decide that this is what you want to pursue, please be reminded that you’ll have to pay to sit for the exams again. There are two ways to go about it:

  • Retaking your O-levels as a private candidate 
  • Retaking your O-levels in your current secondary school, which needs you to meet certain criteria

Retaking as a private candidate demands a lot of self-discipline. You’ll need to work out a studying schedule and keep to it, find out when and where to register for the papers and remember that the extra year you’re taking is an investment of your time and money. Sign up for our preparatory courses for O’levels English or tuition classes and let our tutors guide you. Most of our tutors are former teachers who will definitely be able to give you sound advice. Click here to reach us. 

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Alternatively, ITE offers a General Education (GE) Programme that offers part-time classes for English, Combined Humanities, Maths, Additional Mathematics, Double Sciences, Literature, Geography, Chinese, Tamil as well as Principles of Accounts. Classes run up to 32 weeks.

2. Take a Foundation Course

Private institutions here offer foundation diplomas that you can take—these last anywhere from 6-12 months full-time and give you the qualifications to progress to relevant diplomas offered by the same institution. Admission criteria is manageable for foundation diplomas; typically, all you’ll require is one GCE O-level pass and an O-level grade in English ranging from A1-D7, depending on the private institution.

Alternatively, you can explore pre-university entry programmes from private universities like Kaplan, MDIS, James Cook or even foundation year programmes abroad (which give you the chance to gain admission to overseas universities).

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Do note that this option can be very costly and in times of Covid-19 pandemic, it may not be the best approach at the moment. 

3. Slow down and study in a Centralised Institute

How about joining Millennia Institute (MI)?A Centralised Institute offers three-year pre-university courses under three streams. These are the arts and science streams that a typical JC offers as well as an additional commerce stream. 

The three years will give you a little more time to catch up on your studies and mug for the A-levels if you need some time (again, you’ll still need self-discipline). You’ll need an L1R4 of 5-20 to be eligible for admission.

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Specific subject requirements are as follows:

English Higher Chinese/Malay/Tamil Chinese/Malay/Tamil Chinese Basic/Malay Basic/Tamil Basic E Math/A Math
A1-C6 A1-E8 A1-D7 Merit/Pass A1-D7

 

If you find yourself unable to meet these requirements, Millennia Institute has a conditional student programme which will require you to re-sit for the relevant language and/or mathematics papers O-levels. You can re-take them for 2 times before your offer is revoked.

4. Consider enrolling for Poly Early Admissions Exercise

You can consider studying for a NITEC or Higher NITEC in ITE, before applying for a place in a Polytechnic via the Early Admissions Exercise (EAE). The EAE is a centralised aptitude-based admissions exercise, which allows students to apply for and receive conditional offers for admission to polytechnics prior to receiving their final grades.

This will be a longer route that will require a lot of resilience, but there are many who have taken it before you and succeeded. It’s also a suitable option if you’ve already set your heart on a polytechnic course, or have narrowed down an area of interest. You might need to submit portfolios and undergo interviews and aptitude tests, so start preparing early!

Hopefully, this article clears your doubts and let us link you up with a team of best tutors to help you fulfil your dreams. We are currently offering a trial lesson for private candidates. Email us your interest today.

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“We can never close the gender divide.” Do you agree? 

(For JC GP Prelims Questions 2020, subscribe to our newsletter and YouTube channel. You will be the first to get the latest essays and questions!)

GP Essay Question: Model Essay

As the COVID-19 pandemic pushes on and persists to affect lives and livelihoods around the world, we are witnessing a tide of economic fallout, which has a regressive effect on gender equality. According to Mckinsey Research, women’s jobs are 1.8 times more vulnerable in this crisis compared to men’s jobs and It is predicted that women make up 39 percent of global employment, will account for 54 percent of overall job losses. Some put forth the view that we can never close the gender divide due to such economic realities, legislative barriers and sexist mindsets that pervades in our society today, creating an irreconcilable chasm between males and females. This has led some to believe that the gender divide is insurmountable. However, it is my conviction that while closing the gender divide will be difficult, it is not out of the question, mainly attributed to changing attitudes in legislature and shifts in societal mindsets towards women. Ergo, it will be difficult, but closing the gender divide is indeed possible.

Some espouse the opinion that it is not possible to close the gender divide largely due to the existence of legislative barriers that institutionalise gender discrimination and perpetuate gender inequality. In Singapore, for instance, although the Government has taken steps in the recent years to educate and incentivise employers to be fair and to promote flexible work arrangements so that, yet there is still an absence of legislation that clearly lays out employer duties and responsibilities, this results in many companies being able to get away with little more than superficial commitments to be more inclusive. The situation is even more bleak in less developed countries like India. In the recent years, the numerous cases of rape across the country once again exposed the failures of the criminal justice system. Nearly six years after the government amended laws and put in place new guidelines aimed at justice for survivors of rape and sexual violence, yet girls and women continue to face barriers to reporting such crimes. Victim-blaming is also rampant, and the lack of witness and victim protection laws make girls and women from marginalized communities even more vulnerable to harassment and threats. Across the spectrum, from developing to more developed countries, what persists is a disturbing observation that legislation either explicitly hurts women and promotes sexism, or it condones behaviours that hurt women and promote sexism. It remains a deeply painful and saddening reality that the patriarchy continues to be entrenched in legislature, and ingrained in societal institutions, leading some to think that it is a futile quest and that we can never close the gender divide. In view of all these challenges, it does seem like an uphill task when it comes to closing the gender divide. But to say that it is an impossible dream would be too fatalistic. I strongly stand by the view that closing the gender divide is not completely impossible- there is definitely more than a glimmer of hope. First and foremost, there have been changing attitudes in legislature that have led to tremendous progress for women’s rights on paper. Right here in Singapore, the government has just announced that they will embark on a review of women’s issues showing a strong committed step towards greater gender equality. In the pipeline are a series of engagements termed as “Conversations on Women Development” scheduled to take place between the public and private sectors, as well as non-governmental organisations, with the objective of identifying and tackling issues concerning women in Singapore.  These will culminate in a White Paper to be issued by the Government in the first half of 2021.

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Across the globe, in terms of the right to political representation, the presence of women  has been growing- in the upcoming US Presidential elections, Kamala Harris’s nomination as the Vice President for the democratic party is a milestone. She is the first woman and the first person of colour to serve as vice president.  In Canada, Justin Trudeau made half the ministers in his cabinet women. Similarly, in Singapore, other than having a first female president, the recent election 29 per cent of the 93 seats for elected Members of Parliament (MPs), 27 – or elected seats – went to women, compared to 21 out of 89 seats after the 2015 polls. Even in countries without a female head of government, changes in legislature have indeed been growing to ameliorate gender inequality and boost the rights of women. Japan has adopted new legislation to promote women’s political participation by urging political parties to make the number of male and female candidates as equal as possible and set targets for gender parity. Notoriously patriarchal countries like Afghanistan had a record of 417 female candidates that participated in the October parliamentary elections in 2018. These are all concrete evidence that legislature has been changing to increase rights for women and enact gender parity, closing the gender divide. With more female representation in politics and in view of these steps towards women representation, it is still very much possible for us to close the gender divide in the near future. 

In addition to this, it is definitely possible to close the gender divide because there has also been shifting societal attitudes towards women. At a societal level, the #MeToo movement directed unprecedented attention to the historic injustices and inequalities experienced by women, specifically those related to sexual harassment in the workplace. Led by grassroots activists, this movement gained traction across Asia, opening space for countless stories of harassment and new opportunities to hold perpetrators to account. Even countries that have been traditionally patriarchal in nature like South Korea is making headways in gender equality. Enterprising Korean women are increasingly visible in a traditionally male dominated country like South Korea. More young women are earning university degrees than men. More than 70% of women between 25 and 34 are active in the workforce. Young women are far more vocal than previous generations in challenging the conservative social mores that hold them back. For instance, two female Youtube Influencers Jung Se-young and Baeck Hana, are part of a wave of feminist activism that has swept South Korea. These ladies have cut their hair, thrown away their make-up and sworn off relationships with men. With the advent of social media, the influence of feminism is increasing spreading across social media platforms and society is waking up to the fact that young digital natives no longer want these conservative traditions, and women are free to reject them. Thus, it is highly possible that due to shifting societal attitudes that promote gender equality, the gender divide will be definitely be closed. 

All in all, although the path towards gender equality may seem frustratingly slow. But the fact that inequality is now being openly discussed is progress in itself. In these recent years, societies and government worldwide have been placing gender equality issues on their agenda. With this growing trend towards more rights for women on paper, coupled with the shifting societal mindsets, it is completely possible that our generations will be able to close the gender in our lifetime. The journey towards gender equality may be winding. There is no silver bullet and admittedly there is a lot to do in the field of equality, but nothing is impossible. We must and can continue to fight and narrow the gender divide. 

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(This essay has been reviewed and marked by GP Tutors. For GP tuition by school teachers or full time tutors, contact us today.)

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